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Should Europe help Obama out over Guantanamo?

April 30, 2009

 Barely noticed, the United States sent a top diplomat to  Europe this week to seek help on an important commitment by President Barack Obama — to close the Guantanamo Bay prison.
   
The trip by veteran envoy Dan Fried to Brussels and Prague is part of efforts to persuade European states to take in some of the 241 remaining detainees at the prison, synonomous for many with rights abuses in the “war on terror” under U.S. President George W. Bush.
   
Europe has long called for the jail to be shut down, but only a few countries — such as France, Portugal and Albania — have  volunteered to resettle any inmates from third countries such as Afghanistan or China.
   
 Time is steadily running out if Obama is to achieve his goal of clearing and closing the prison by next January.  A perceived  lack of European help could sour the much-vaunted new start in transatlantic ties which both sides say they want.
  
But many European officials are asking why they should help the United States out of a hole it dug itself into.
   
The main problem does not involve the small number of  so-called high-value  terror suspects in the camp — they will remain in detention and Washington does not seriously expect anyone to come forward and take them off its hands.
   
Nor does it involve the 17 detainees who have already been cleared for release. The really hot issue is the fate of  the remaining detainees who are not high risk but have not been given the full all-clear.
   
 European officials fear the affair could turn into a legal and political nightmare. Who will take which detainees? Given that much of Europe is now border-free, how will one country reassure its neighbours if it agrees to resettle inmates? And doesn’t the fact that European states have different national policies on surveillance and detention pose extra problems?
   
Worse still, the political fall-out could be devastating. If , for example, a former Guantanamo Bay prisoner carried out an attack in Germany just before an election this year, how would Chancellor Angela Merkel explain it to voters? 

Washington knows it won’t be easy to get the Europeans on board. But it says it would be hypocritical for Europe now not to help after all its criticism of Guantanamo.

It also points out that some of the Europeans who are now raising concerns over security were not so long ago saying  most of the Guantanamo Bay prisoners were innocent.
   
Washington hopes to encourage EU justice and home affairs ministers to at least agree a common line on the need to help it with Guantanamo at a regular meeting scheduled for June. Then it will approach individual countries for negotiations on resettling specific cases.
   
Is it time for Europe tocome forward and help Obama or is this one file on which it is advised to stay clear?

Comments

Why do they not take them to USA?

Posted by zsolt | Report as abusive
 

No, they should relocate Guantanamo to Alaska, and if any of the inmates are innocent of terrorism, then bang them up on immigration charges!

Posted by Peter H | Report as abusive
 

Peter, shouldn’t people clean up their own messes instead of leaving it for someone else? Or is this the new American way?

Posted by A | Report as abusive
 

Once again the annoying element of European hypocrisy raises it’s head. It was European critics who claimed that Guantanamo Bay prisoners were innocent and now there are concerns? The US has helped Europe throughout the 20th century dig itself out of “holes” it dug itself into and now when we ask for a little help all there is is either silence or more criticism. It seems Europeans are good at feel good protesting and finger pointing but when it comes to actually doing good which may actually require so sacrifice then the silence is deafening. This seems to be the old and new European way. I believe the US should re-evaluate it’s European relationship. It seem a bit one-sided to me.

Posted by Moman | Report as abusive
 

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