Global News Journal

Beyond the World news headlines

Ghosts of dead leftists could haunt Peru’s Garcia

Photo

Former Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori was sentenced on Tuesday to 25 years in prison for ordering two massacres in the 1990s when Peru was at war with leftist guerrillas, and the ruling could haunt the current president, Alan Garcia.

In his first term in the 1980s, Garcia, frustrated that the brutal Shining Path insurgency had taken over El Fronton prison, told the navy to attack it. The prison, which sits on an island just off the coast of Lima, was bombed by airplanes before soldiers went in on the ground to retake control. Many unarmed prisoners were summarily executed. More than 200 were killed at El Fronton and two other prisons where rebellions were repressed in 1986.

Rights groups say the Fujimori verdict could increase pressure to put Garcia, who leaves office in 2011, on trial. Luis Giampietri, who is now vice president, was in charge of the navy at the time of the attack.

Picture Credit: Reuters/Mariana Bazo. Peruvian President Alan Garcia speaks to media, Nov. 27, 2008.

from MacroScope:

You say ’30s, we say ’20s

Neil Dwane, fund firm RCM's chief investment officer in Europe, has an interesting take on the current spat between Germany and the United States over printing money to get out of trouble. You can see Juergen Stark for the latest volley.

Dwane reckons it is all a matter of history. The American psyche, he says, is scarred by the Great Depression of the 1930s. It is up there with the Civil War. Think John Steinbeck or John Boy Walton.

North Korean Revolutionary Tunes Sink to Bottom of the Sea

Photo

                                              By Jon Herskovitz

North Korea says somewhere up in the sky, a satellite it launched at the weekend is beaming to earth two revolutionary paeans: “Song of General Kim Il-sung” for the founder of the reclusive state and “Song of General Kim Jong-il,” for the son who succeeded him when he died.

from Pakistan: Now or Never?:

Defending women’s rights in Afghanistan and Pakistan

Barely had President Barack Obama outlined a new strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan meant to narrow the focus to eliminating the threat from al Qaeda and its Islamist allies, before the U.S.-led campaign ran into what was always going to be one of its biggest problems in limiting its goals. What does it do about the rights of women in the region?

The treatment of women has dominated the headlines this week after Afghan President Hamid Karzai signed a new law for the minority Shi'ite population which both the United States and the United Nations said could undermine women's rights. Karzai has promised a review of the law, while also complaining it was misinterpreted by Western journalists. 

Sex, drugs and toxic shrubs: the best reads of March

Photo

Cubans indulge baseball mania at Havana’s “Hot Corner”

For all the shouting and nose-to-nose confrontations, visitors to Havana’s Parque Central might think they had walked into a brawl or counter-revolution … but here in the park’s Hot Corner,  the topic almost always under discussion is baseball, Cuba’s national obsession.

Iraq’s orphans battle to outgrow abuse

At night, Salah Abbas Hisham wakes up screaming. Sometimes, in the dark, he silently attacks the boy next to him in a tiny Baghdad orphanage where 33 boys sleep on cots or on the floor. Salah, who saw both his parents blown apart in a car bomb, can never be left alone at night.

“Vietnam the war” back in the frame after Afghanistan

Photo

 For many, Vietnam has always been two things – a war and a country. Since probably the mid-1990s, though, when Washington and Hanoi established diplomatic relations, the balance — in terms of headlines at least — started to tip decisively toward “Vietnam the country”.

 

Vietnam’s economic transition and integration with the world has, indeed, made for some decent reading. So it’s been interesting to note since moving to Hanoi a few months ago the strong comeback that “Vietnam the war” has made in the form of articles about Afghanistan and the Obama presidency.

from UK News:

On the frontline of the G20 summit

Abolish money. Punish the  looters. Eat the bankers.

Ageing 1960s hippies and their youthful anti-globalisation descendants joined in an angry  anti-capitalist protest at the Bank of England on Wednesday, waving placards and shouting slogans reflecting  a common fury at perceived corporate greed.

With worldwide recession destroying jobs by the week, protesters at the G20 protest in the City of London demanded an end to what they see as a global, predatory system that robs the poor to benefit the privileged.

Austria, gas and the big bad Russians

Photo

Could an Austrian oil and gas group with more than 41,000 employees, some 25.5 billion euros turnover and a presence in more than 20 countries actually be a secret front for Russian gas giants, extending their tentacles of power into Europe?

It could be if you believe Zsolt Hernadi, the chairman of Hungarian rival MOL, not to mention some scary headlines about Russian gas in the British press.

  •