France frets about the right to rap

July 15, 2009

Should rappers be able to sing whatever they like in the name of art and should politicians be able to stop them taking to the stage? The question of censorship has jumped back to the fore in France with President Nicolas Sarkozy’s government, in a rather unlikely about-turn, jumping to the defence of a foul-mouthed rapper, while a leading Socialist has tried to muzzle him.

The rapper — pictured in the video above — is called Orelsan, a white, middle-class singer sometimes referred to as “France’s Eminem”, who shot to prominence earlier this year when a video of one of his songs became an Internet hit. Here is a taste of the lyrics (with the worst of the sexual imagery omitted!)

“I hate you, I want you to die slowly, I want you to get pregnant and lose your child … you are just a pig who should go straight to the slaughter house … I am going to get you pregnant and then abort you with a shepherd’s knife.”

The song is old and no longer appears in Orelsan’s stage show, but the controversy lingers.

Organisers of a music festival in La Rochelle in Western France said this week they were forced to drop him from their line up after a local Socialist bigwig, Segolene Royal, threatened to cut their public subsidy if he appeared.

Royal was the Socialist party candidate in the 2007 presidential election, and news that she might have pulled the plug on Orelsan fuelled immediate outrage in the centre-right government, which accused her of “intolerable” interference.

(Photo: Segolene Royal, 1 May 2009/Regis Duvignau)

“Orelsan talks about unrequited love in terms that I wouldn’t use … but he has the total right to do so,” said Culture Minister Frederic Mitterrand, the nephew of former Socialist President Francois Mitterrand.

He went on to compare Orelsan to Rimbaud, the bad boy of French 19th century poetry. “Rimbaud wrote much more violent things that went on to become classics.”

Mitterrand only took over as culture minister in a cabinet reshuffle last month. His predecessor, Christine Albanel, took a very different line back in March when she asked Internet sites to block the offending song. “Freedom of expression stops when incitement to violence and sickening hatred begins,” she said at the time.

(Photo Frederic Mitterrand, 24 June 2009/Benoit Tessier)

So what has changed? Is it that a man is now in charge of Culture in France, is it that a prominent Socialist tried to intervene or is it that France has suddenly become much less tolerant of any whiff of censorship?

2 comments

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The real concern is whether or not such denegrating speech can influence people to take action. If such is the case then sensorship will not work. Such a society that is at risk to embraces the hatred and victimization of women has already lost it’s humanity.

Perhaps we should consider whether or not such art is meant to lead a society or is simply reflecting where said society is already at? If such work is merely a barometer of how a society is decaying,then that should be considered reason enough to revisit societies ills and how to address them.

Posted by Anubis | Report as abusive

Music has always had inflammatory lyrics, it’s just that Hip-Hop is the new form, and so it gets way too much critical backlash because it’s what kids and young adults are into nowadays. Part of the problem is that people don’t know enough about Hip-Hop and its history to get a clear picture of what the genre is about, and also the artistic choices and decisions that go into the music. People need to read more books on the subject – all the following are great books that look at Hip-Hop as an art form first and from the socio-political angle second (how it should be):

Check The Technique http://www.waxfacts.com
Can’t Stop Won’t Stop http://www.cantstopwontstop.com
How To Rap http://www.howtorapbook.com
Classic Material http://www.o-dub.com/classic/classic.htm l

Posted by Jimmy | Report as abusive