Global News Journal

Beyond the World news headlines

German state elections: Live

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10 p.m. - So it’s a black eye for Merkel and her conservative party four weeks before the federal election with the likely loss of power in two of three states that went to the polls on Sunday. But will it make a difference for the federal election on Sept. 27? Will Steinmeier’s SPD, now in the driver’s seat to win state offices from the CDU for the first time since 2001, be able to take advantage of the momentum? Will the CDU start to get nervous again after squandering big leads in last month of the 2002 and 2005 federal elections? September could be an exciting month in Germany.

 

9:50 p.m.  Bild newspaper’s Nikolaus Blome writes in a column for Monday’s early editions: “It was an earthquake kicking off the hot phase of the national campaign…The CDU has been spoiled by its past success but now has it in writing that the Sept. 27 election is far from decided.”

 

9:10 p.m. - Here is a video clip of Steinmeier savouring the SPD’s likely move into power in two of the three states that voted on Sunday. It’s been a l-o-n-g time since anyone in Germany has seen the SPD celebrating. Merkel kept a low profile on Sunday evening. No one saw or heard from her.

 

8:10 p.m. - Here’s another way to tell the winners from the losers. Peter Mueller (on the left), who will likely lose his job as state premier of Saarland, was asked in an ARD TV interview just now what his party leader, Chancellor Angela Merkel, might have told him to try to cheer him up in the two hours since the disappointing results for the CDU were published. “She hasn’t called me,” Mueller said, sounding lonely in his defeat. His SPD rival Heiko Maas (right) was then asked if SPD chancellor candidate Frank-Walter Steinmeier had been in touch: “Yes, he and (SPD chairman Franz) Muentefering both called and said they were delighted and said it’s a great signal for the federal election.”

from FaithWorld:

Is a moral instinct the source of our noble thoughts?

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judgmentUntil not too long ago, most people believed human morality was based on scripture, culture or reason. Some stressed only one of those sources, others mixed all three. None would have thought to include biology. With the progress of neuroscientific research in recent years, though, a growing number of psychologists, biologists and philosophers have begun to see the brain as the base of our moral views. Noble ideas such as compassion, altruism, empathy and trust, they say, are really evolutionary adaptations that are now fixed in our brains. Our moral rules are actually instinctive responses that we express in rational terms when we have to justify them. (Photo: Religious activist at a California protest, 10 June 2005/Gene Blevins)

Thanks to a flurry of popular articles, scientists have joined the ranks of those seen to be qualified to speak about morality, according to anthropologist Mark Robinson, a Princeton Ph.D student who discussed this trend at the University of Pennsylvania's Neuroscience Boot Camp. "In our current scientific society, where do people go to for the truth about human reality?" he asked. "It used to be you might read a philosophy paper or consult a theologian. But now there seems to be a common public sense that the authority over what morality is can be found by neuroscientists or scientists."

from FaithWorld:

Obama evokes church/state divide at National Prayer Breakfast

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Religion's role in U.S. politics was on full display on Thursday as President Barack Obama spoke and prayed at the annual National Prayer Breakfast.

Obama, an adult convert to Christianity, used the occasion to announce that he will be establishing a White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. This will replace or be an extension of the Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives established by former President George W. Bush, who was strongly supported by conservative Christians.

from FaithWorld:

U.S. ideology stable, “culture trench warfare” ahead?

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The U.S. Democratic Party has gained a larger following over the past two decades but America's ideological landscape has remained largely unchanged over the past two decades, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press. You can see the analysis here.

What is of interest for readers of this blog may be the implications of this "cultural trench warfare" -- with neither side gaining much ground from the other -- for red-hot social issues such as abortion rights and the future prospects for both the Republicans and the Democrats.

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