Global News Journal

Beyond the World news headlines

Does Greece really deserve such a market pummelling?

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So there’s no question Greece has work to do to improve its bookkeeping.

Not only must it get spending in check,  but it needs to be a bit more honest about where its finances stand in the first place. After all, it’s not often an EU country says one month that its budget deficit is a little over three percent of GDP and admits a few weeks later that, oh dear, it’s actually nearer 13 percent.

Yet it’s hard not to have a little sympathy for Greece at the same time.

Its government bonds have been hammered and the price it has to pay to finance its debt has soared as financial markets have relentlessly taken it to task over the past six weeks for its profligacy.

The yield on 10-year Greek government bonds over dependable German Bunds (the spread) rose to more than 400 basis points — a euro-era record — at one point last week, meaning Greece had to offer a 4-percentage-point premium over Germany to entice people to buy its debt, offering a yield of more than 7 percent. That obviously increases its debt financing costs and leaves it even more in a fiscal hole than it needs to be at a time when it’s trying to raise more than 50 billion euros to finance the budget — and when finances are already under pressure following the economic crisis.

Undoubtedly some of that 400-point spread was justified. It’s clear that Greece is not Germany when it comes to the administration of public finances.

from Global Investing:

Austrian subprime woes turn into political hot potato

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The Austrian government debt agency’s two-year old foray into subprime investments has turned into a political hot potato and sparked an increasingly heated debate between the Social Democrats and conservatives, caught in an uneasy but coalition government without viable alternative.

Austria’s audit court last week revealed that the agency, which in its staid day job issues government bonds and makes sure state coffers are full when they need to be, started to moonlight on money markets in 2002 to earn a little extra money on the side.

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