Global Investing

Weekly Radar: Question mark for the ‘austerians’

April 25, 2013

One of the more startling moves of the week was the fresh rally in euro government debt – with 10-year Italian and Spanish borrowing rates falling to their lowest since late 2010 when the euro crisis was just erupting and 2-year Italian yields even falling to 1999 euro launch levels. The trigger? There’s been a slow build up for weeks on the prospect of new Japanese investor flows  seeking liquid overseas government bonds  – but it was signs of a sharp slowdown in Germany’s economy that seems to have had a perversely positive effect on the region’s asset markets as a whole. The logic is that German objections to another ECB rate cut will ebb, as will its refusal to ease up on front-loaded fiscal austerity across Europe. If its own economic engine is now suffering along with the rest, significantly just five months ahead of German Federal elections, then a tilt toward growth in the regional policy mix may not seem so bad for Berlin after all. And if euro economies are more in synch, albeit in recession rather than growth, then perhaps it will lead to a more effective regional policy response.

All that plays into the intensifying “growth vs austerity” debate, which had already shifted at the Washington IMF meetings last week and was sharpened this week by by EU Commission chief Barroso’s claim that the high watermark of EU’s austerity push had passed. On top of the Reinhart/Rogoff research farrago, it’s been a bad couple of weeks for the “austerians”, with only a UK Q1 GDP bounceback of any support for case of ever deeper fiscal cuts,  and investors smell a change of tack. Their reaction? Not only have euro government borrowing costs fallen  further, but euro equities too rallied for 4 straight days through Wednesday. Those arguing that investors would run screaming at the sight of a more growth-tilted policy mix in Europe may have some explaining to do.

Next week is back on monetary policy watch however. The ECB takes centre stage amid rate cut talks hopes for help for credit-starved SMEs. The FOMC meets stateside aswell just ahead of the critical US April employment report.

Major events next week:

Iceland elections Sat

EZ biz/consumer confidence Mon

German April inflation Mon

Italy/France/Belgium govt bond auctions Mon

Europe Q1 earnings Mon: Fiat, Volkswagen, Deutsche Boerse

US March pending home sales Mon

Japan March jobless, spending, production, housing Tues

Europe Q1 earnings Tues: BP, Deutsche Bank, UBS, Lloyds, EdF, Whitbread

German April unemployment Tues

EZ April inflation Tues

UK March mortgage/credit data Tues

US Q1 earnings Tues: Marathon, Pfizer, FMC

US April consumer confidence, Chicago PMI Tues

ADB meeting in New Delhi, Weds-Sun

UK local elections Weds

US April manufacturing ISM Weds

FOMC decision Weds

Global manufacturing PMIs Thurs

European Commission Spring forecasts Thurs

ECB decision/presser Thurs

BoE decision Thurs

US Q1 earnings Thurs:  AIG, Kraft, International Paper

US March trade Thurs

BOJ minutes Fri

India monetary policy statement Fri

US Q1 earnings Fri: ADP, Moody’s, Duke Energy

US April employment report/Services PMI Fri

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