The hit from China’s growth slowdown

October 11, 2013

China’s slowing economy is raising concern about the potential spillovers beyond its shores, in particular the impact on other emerging markets. Because developing countries have over the past decade significantly boosted exports to China to offset slow growth in the West and Japan, these countries are unquestionably vulnerable to a Chinese slowdown. But how big will the hit be?

Goldman Sachs analysts have crunched the numbers to show which markets and regions could be hardest hit. On the face of it non-Japan Asia should be most worried — exports to China account for almost 3 percent of GDP while in Latin America it is 2 percent and in emerging Europe, Middle East and Africa (CEEMEA) it is just 1.1 percent, their data shows.

But they warn that standard trade stats won’t tell the whole story. That’s because a high proportion of EM exports are re-processed in other countries before reaching China which in turn often re-works them for re-export to the developed world. In other words, exports to China from say, Taiwan, may be driven not so much by Chinese demand but by demand for goods in the United States or Europe. So gross trade data may actually be overstating a country’s vulnerability to a Chinese slowdown.

GS relies instead on so-called “trade in value-added” data that allows it to separate direct exports to China and indirect trade connections. Measured this way and using industrial output as a proxy for growth, emerging Asia’s effective exposure to China turns out to be half of that measured using gross trade data:

In terms of levels, a one standard deviation shock to China’s industrial production  (roughly equivalent to a 4 percent annualised growth shock) would lower the level of industrial output in non-Japan Asia by some 0.6 percent on average in 12 months from the time of the shock, so roughly by as much as the fall in China’s industrial production in that period, as per our model estimates. The average impact would be smaller for the CEEMEA countries (some 0.5 percent on average) and the LatAm countries (0.43 percent).

And in terms of GDP:

The same shock would affect GDP in Asian EMs the most. GDP level could fall there by about 0.36 percent on average, so as much as in China. The impact on CEEMEA (just below 0.3 percent) and LatAm (0.25 percent) would be more limited

All in all the figures are probably not giving policymakers sleepless nights. Philippine or South Korean growth may take a half-percent impact in the first year after the Chinese slowdown while in India or Poland the hit will be as little as 0.2 percent, Goldman calculates.

 

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