Global Investing

Turkish savers hang onto dollars

November 6, 2013

As in many countries with memories of hyperinflation and currency collapse, Turkey’s middle class have tended to hold at least part of their savings in hard currency. But unlike in Russia and Argentina, Turkish savers’ propensity to save in dollars has on occasion proved helpful to companies and the central bank. That’s because many Turks, rather than just accumulating dollars, have evolved into savvy players of exchange rate swings and often use sharp falls in the lira to sell their dollars and buy back the local currency. Hence Turks’ hard currency bank deposits, estimated at between $70-$100 billion –  on a par with central bank reserves — have acted as a buffer of sorts, stabilising the lira when it falls past a certain level.

Value or growth? The dichotomy of emerging market shares

November 5, 2013

Investors in emerging markets are facing a tough choice. Should one buy cheap shares in the hope that poor corporate governance and profitability will improve some day? Or is it better to close one’s eyes and buy into expensively valued companies that sell mobile telephones, holidays and handbags — all the things high-spending emerging market consumers hanker after?

Private equity stakes out Africa

By Reuters Staff
October 28, 2013

Many private equity firms are adamant that Africa is the next hot spot for the industry as its burgeoning middle class continues to bloom, but the pension and endowment funds who invest in private equity funds are more cautious.

Bond market liberalisation — good or bad for India?

October 18, 2013

Many investors have greeted with enthusiasm India’s plans to get its debt included in international indices such as those run by JPMorgan and Barclays. JPM’s local debt indices, known as the GBI-EM,  were tracked by almost $200 billion at the end of 2012.  So even very small weightings in such indices will give India a welcome slice of investment from funds tracking them.

Emerging equities: out of the doghouse

October 18, 2013

Emerging stocks, in the doghouse for months and months, haven’t done too badly of late. The main EM index,  has rallied more than 11 percent since its end-August troughs, outgunning the S&P 500′s 3 percent rise in this period. Bank of America/Merrill Lynch strategist Michael Hartnett reminds us of the extreme underweight positioning in emerging stocks last month, as revealed by his bank’s monthly investor survey.  Anyone putting on a long EM-short UK equities trade back then would have been in the money with returns of 540 basis points, he says.

The hit from China’s growth slowdown

October 11, 2013

China’s slowing economy is raising concern about the potential spillovers beyond its shores, in particular the impact on other emerging markets. Because developing countries have over the past decade significantly boosted exports to China to offset slow growth in the West and Japan, these countries are unquestionably vulnerable to a Chinese slowdown. But how big will the hit be?

Picking and choosing African dollar debt

By Reuters Staff
October 4, 2013

The end of the era of cheap money need not spell disaster for African governments looking to raise money at affordable levels. While an eventual scaling back of the Fed’s $85 billion-a-month bond-buying programme will spark a reshuffling in investors’ portfolios, it will not shut African governments out of the international debt market altogether.

Vietnam stocks streak ahead in Asia

September 26, 2013

It’s been a good year for frontier markets, though some have done better than others. One success story has been Vietnam.

Bernanke Put for emerging markets? Not really

September 23, 2013

The Fed’s unexpectedly dovish position last week has sparked a rally in emerging markets — not only did the U.S. central bank’s all-powerful boss Ben Bernanke keep his $85 billion-a-month money printing programme in place, he also mentioned emerging markets in his post-meeting news conference, noting the potential impact of Fed policy on the developing world. All that, along with the likelihood of the dovish Janet Yellen succeeding Bernanke was described by Commerzbank analysts as “a triple whammy for EM.” A positive triple whammy, presumably.