MSCI, the index provider used by leading investors across the world, has decided it needs a name change in Greater China. In a news release this morning the firm (which is no longer owned by Morgan Stanley, the MS in its title) said its Chinese business would henceforth be branded as  MSCI 明晟.

When I tweeted this @reutersJeremyG, one wag suggested  this meant "MSCI small-ladder-bigger-ladder-books-on-a-picnic-table", which is what it indeed looks like to an untrained eye (like mine).  But it is actually Ming Sheng, which  apparently is supposed to symbolise "brightness and transparency, prosperity and splendour".

That might sound a little flowery for an index provider, but is arguably apt given the role such indices have in opening up markets to investment.

The key point, however, is that MSCI decided it needed a Chinese business name. Henry Fernandez, MSCI's chairman and chief executive officer, said that as his business had grown in China, so it had become increasingly important to have local branding.

So we have MSCI Bright Splendour, or something like that.  Parlour game time: What would other companies be?