Global Investing

Big Beasts

March 26, 2013

This week might just have seen a marked shift in how British investors think about their role as owners of companies.

Investors investigated

November 20, 2012

We’ve wondered before about the validity of the British ‘shareholder spring’ narrative. A few high-profile casualties gave the story drama, but as we showed back in the summer, evidence of a widespread change in thinking was hard to find. KPMG has arrived at a similar conclusion this week.

Making the most of the shareholder spring

October 3, 2012

We’ve had a fair while to ponder the implications of a British AGM season which saw investors oust a few CEOs and deal bloody noses to a few others. We’ve also had some data which implies the revolt wasn’t as widespread as advertised, but Sacha Sadan at Legal and General Investment Management thinks we have seen something important, and something that must be exploited.

GUEST BLOG: The missing reform in the Kay Review

July 26, 2012

Simon Wong is partner at investment firm Governance for Owners, adjunct professor of law at Northwestern University School of Law, and visiting fellow at the London School of Economics. He can be found on Twitter at @SimonCYWong. The opinions expressed reflect his personal views only.

The other WPP protest

June 14, 2012

So, the CEO of the world’s biggest advertising firm failed to pitch his own pay deal to WPP’s investors.

Discovering the pleasure of dividends in Russia

February 20, 2012

American financier J.D. Rockefeller said watching dividends rolling in was the only thing that gave him pleasure. But it is a pleasure which until now has largely bypassed shareholders in most big Russian companies. That might be about to change.

from Funds Hub:

Got those zombie company covenant lite blues

June 4, 2010

Zombies 2One of the big drivers of the debt balloon that imploded so spectacularly was the trend for covenant "lite", which has allowed zombie companies to stumble on long past the point at which it would have been useful for creditors to intervene. This has sharpened the appetite for stronger corporate governance around covenants and persuaded investors that they need to take more of an active interest in what companies are actually doing with their money.