Global Investing

Why Abenomics is leading to a squid shortage in Japan

“Abenomics” — Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s aggressive reflationary fiscal and monetary policy — is widely praised for injecting optimism into the world’s third largest economy and making Tokyo stocks the best performing equity market in the world this year.

However, in Japan, something odd is happening as a result of Abenomics — a big shortage of squid.

Japan Squid Fisheries Association (JAFRA) decided to halt all fishing operations this Friday and Saturday because a weaker yen is pushing petrol prices higher, to the extent that going out to the sea will bring a guaranteed loss. The yen has lost more than 13 percent against the dollar since the start of the year.

Squid fishing is highly energy-intensive because fishers use light to lure squid at night. Fuel makes up around a third of the cost of fishing.

There is a government subsidy for fishermen when energy prices surge. But according to JAFRA, even with the subsidy, the average loss per boat can go up to as much as 200,000 yen ($2,009) per year at the current dollar/yen exchange level of around 100.

Greenland – new and poor country?

Greenland, an arctic island with a population of 57,000, voted for self-governance from Denmark in a referendum on Tuesday. The “Yes” camp won an overwhelming 75 percent of the vote.

Shrimp and halibut fishing and tourism form the backbone of the economy but the island is rich in minerals and its waters may hold vast hydrocarbon reserves.

The resources setting is very much like one of Iceland, although Greenland – made up mostly of Inuit people who live in small, isolated villages – does not have a huge banking sector. (Neither does Iceland these days, some might argue.)