Global Investing

from MacroScope:

Scams from Abuja to Reykjavik

It suffered the collapse of its currency, economy and banking system so being invoked in a version of the notorious Nigerian email scam is one of the smaller humiliations endured by Iceland.

The confidence trick, which has roots in the 18th century, usually involves an email from someone claiming to be either a deposed African dictator or a Nigerian lawyer, promising a sum of money in return for help to access a substantial fortune.

But the latest spam email making its rounds purports to be from Iceland, one of the highest profile sovereign casualties of the global financial crisis. This version of the email is supposedly from a "devoted christian (sic)" from Iceland", a widow seeking help to access $6 million in a Canadian bank left to her by her husband who worked for an oil giant for 19 years.

Besides the grammatical errors, the email stretches credulity with the notion that the widow's husband would have chosen to park his savings at a Canadian bank rather than the Icelandic ones that would have -- at least until their collapse late 2008 -- offered interest rates in excess of over six percent.

These high-flying banks, which once took in so-called Icesave retail deposits in London and Amsterdam, are now at the centre of a dispute that pits the North Atlantic island nation of 320,000 people against Britain and the Netherlands.

Iceland for sale — collect in person

Iceland for saleIceland is for sale — on ebay.

It has great scenery and wildlife but the financial situation is in need of repair and a buyer must collect in person.

Bidding started at 99 pence but had reached 10 million pounds ($17.28 million) by mid-morning on Friday.

Globally renowned singer Bjork was “not included” in the sale, according to the notice, but there were nonetheless 26 anonymous bidders and 84 bids.

Icelandic saga spreads chill from freezer cabinets to soccer clubs

icelandic-glacier.jpgIt’s already on a geological fault line — now the economy of Iceland risksĀ being torn apart by the banking crisis.

But the saga of the North Atlantic islandĀ of Iceland does not stop at its own rocky shores.

Riding a wave of cheap borrowing, Icelandic investors spread their interests far and wide, taking stakes in companies as diverse as New York department store Saks, Finnish insurer Sampo and English soccer club West Ham United.