Global Investing

Russia’s new Eurobond: what’s the fair price?

Russia’s upcoming dollar bond, the first in two years, should fly off the shelves. It’s good timing — elections are past, the world economy seems to be recovering and crucially for Russia, oil prices are over $125 a barrel.  And the rise in core yields has massively tightened emerging markets’ yield premium to  U.S. Treasuries, offering an attractive window to raise cash.  Russia’s spread premium over Treasuries hit the narrowest levels in 7 months recently and despite some widening this week it is still some 75 basis points below end-2011 levels.

Initial indications from the ongoing roadshow are for a two-tranche bond with 10- and 20-year maturities, possibly raising a total of $3.5 billion.

But market bullishness notwithstanding, investors say Moscow should resist temptation to price the bond too high, a mistake it made during its last foray into global capital markets in April 2010. Fund managers have unpleasant memories of that deal, recalling that Russia unexpectedly tightened the yield offered by 25-28 bps, making the bond an expensive one for investors who had already placed bids. The bond price fell sharply once trading kicked off and yields across the Russian curve rose around 25-30 basis points. Jeremy Brewin, a fund manager at Aviva said:

Russia has a slightly disappointing reputation.. We all ended up paying a tighter spread than we expected. Everyone is concerned they will get pulled in too tight again.

James Croft, head of emerging debt trading at Mitsubishi-UFJ agrees:

The demand for Russian risk is such that getting this bond away should be no problem. The only impediment that could make the transaction harder is investors’ wariness, based on the negative experience of the last deal back in 2010.

Healthy flows into money market funds

Despite concerns about contagion from the euro zone, investors injected fresh funds into U.S. mutual funds, including money market funds, latest weekly flow data from Lipper shows.

The week ended Nov 16 saw a net $10 billion inflow into mutual funds, including ETFs, while investors were net buyers of equity funds with flows at $2.8 billion. Equity funds, including ETFs, witnessed their fifth consecutive week of net inflows.

Reflecting jitters over the debt crisis however, investors injected $2.8 billion into taxable fixed income funds and for the second week in a row bought into money market funds to the tune of $2.9 billion.