Global Investing

Calling CCCs

Junk bonds have enjoyed a rally since the start of the year but investors are facing a dilemma.

Should you buy larger, more liquid bonds that have already risen significantly, or buy smaller, illiquid bonds that have an attractive price?

Barclays Capital says triple-C rated bonds — the riskier segment of the junk space — are beginning to catch up with less risky issues because higher rated bonds have increasingly run into “call constraints”.

(For non bond geeks: Some corporate bonds have an embedded call option that allows the issuer to redeem the debt before its maturity date. )

Barclays says as of Wednesday’s close, 71 percent of callable BBs and 57 percent of callable single Bs were trading above their next call price, compared with just 29 percent of CCCs.

from Reuters Investigates:

Financial cyber-bullying?

"They love a conspiracy theory on the boards," David Jones, chief market strategist at spread betting firm IG Index told UK correspondents Rosalba O'Brien and Matt Scuffham when they were reporting for "The stock, the web, the CEO and his lawyers" . It's a look at some of the shenanigans around highly speculative resource stocks when they are discussed on message boards like  ADVFN and iii. Late-night gossip and personal insults are par for the course: some suspect organised short-sellers may be behind the talk. Given the high volumes of online trading in the UK, we wonder how long it will be before regulator FSA is forced to take a closer look.

Day-trader John Douce is sceptical about the boards' impact on stock prices

Day-trader John Douce is sceptical about the boards' impact on stock prices

Global FTSE 100 shrugs off parochial UK GDP data

Britain’s FTSE 100 seems to be almost impervious to any bad data that can be thrown at it. GDP data shocked the market showing the UK unexpectedly contracted in the third quarter.

Sterling tumbled more than a cent against the greenbackand gilts jumped while the FTSEurofirst 300 pan-European equity index trimmed gains considerably.

But Britain’s FTSE shrugged it off, hugging its 1 percent gains in the face of data which shows the UK economy is still ailing badly.

Terminal problems

If Nigerian banks appear to have suffered disproportionately in the global financial crisis, maybe they have Heathrow Terminal 5 to blame.

Nigerian banks were advertising their services on billboards in Terminal 5 last year, and travelling investors felt it showed the banks were rashly trying to keep up with international investment banks in aiming for a global profile, causing many to sell, a banker specialising in Africa told journalists this morning over breakfast.

“Those adverts were a sign to sell Nigerian banks,” Luca del Conte, executive director in treasury and capital markets at Medicapital Bank said.

from Funds Hub:

Watch hedge fund manager Colin McLean give his market outlook

McLean was speaking today at London leg of the Reuters Hedge Fund and Private Equity Summit.