Global Investing

It’s all adding up – emerging markets to drive global spending

The world’s leading ad agencies are positioning themselves  in Brazil, Russia and China — countries that are expected to provide almost a third of the growth in global advertising over the next three years. That’s according to a report by S&P Capital IQ Equity Research, a unit of publishing giant McGraw Hill.

Most major advertisers already have a foothold in these BRIC economies, where the advertising market is projected to grow by an average 10.7 percent  a year over the next three years — more than three times the growth rate in  the developed world.  Over the next 15 years,  big emerging markets will add $200 billion to the global ad spend, S&P Capital IQ reckons.

Hopes, unsurprisingly, are pinned on the soccer World Cup in 2014 and the 2016 Olympics, both hosted by Brazil. Russia hosts the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi and Football World cup in 2018 and both these events are expected to boost ad spending. The behemoths of the ad world have prepared for this, says Alex Wisch, an analyst at S&P Capital IQ:

    The global agencies have already developed a solid foundation in the BRICs, so the heavy lifting on the investment ramp is largely behind them.

Rio 2016

(Graphic under creative commons)

Accordingly, S&P Capital IQ has a ‘buy’ recommendation on advertising agencies Publicis, Interpublic and Omnicon while advising a “hold” on WPP.

Running for gold? The long-distance investor

What are you best at? Running a sprint?  Jumping a few hurdles? Or would you rather gear up for the long-haul with a marathon?

With the London 2012 Olympics in full speed UK investors are going for the long-distance rather than try to follow in Usain Bolt’s speed-lightning sprints, a poll by Barclays Stockbrokers showed.

Thirty-one percent of surveyed clients liken their investment strategy to a marathon ( “investing for the long term” ) and 34 percent to an heptathlon (“long term investment strategy which requires several different approaches.”)

Money in containers. Many see big bucks in Russia’s infrastructure push

A lot of things are wrong with Russia, one of them being its rickety infrastructure.

Many see this as an investment opportunity, however, reckoning the planned $1 trillion infrastructure upgrade plan will get going, especially with the 2014 Winter Olympics and 2018 soccer World Cup looming. Bets on infrastructure have also gathered pace as the Kremlin, seeking to placate a mutinous populace, has pledged reforms, privatisations and a general push to reduce Russia’s dependence on oil exports.

Takouhi Tchertchian at asset managers Renaissance says one sector – shipping containers — reflects the potential for gains from infrastructure improvements. Such containers, usually made of steel, can be loaded and transported over long distances, and transferred easily and cheaply from sea to road to rail.  But Russia has among the lowest levels of containerisation in the world, at around 4 percent compared to the emerging markets average of 15 percent, Tchertchian says. Even in India, almost 3o percent of goods travel by container while in a developed country like Britain, the figure is 40 percent.

More than just Games for Beijing

beijing.jpgBritain’s Association of Investment Companies is making the case that the Beijing Olympics will have a major, positive impact on investors’ perceptions of China.

They cite a number of portfolio managers who argue that there has already been a major economic boost to the Beijing area from the Games to add to the red-hot national economy.

Beyond this, there is talk of the Games as a showcase for China’s achievements. As John Millar of Martin Currie Pacific notes: “As we saw with South Korea in 1988, such an event can have a major impact on the international perceptions of a
country.”