Golnar's Feed
Oct 28, 2010

UK’s Mouchel hit by govt cuts, shares slump

LONDON Oct 28 (Reuters) – British outsourcing and consulting
firm Mouchel Plc (MCHL.L: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) slumped to a full-year loss and warned
of an uncertain outlook due to government austerity measures,
wiping more than a quarter off its stock market value.

Mouchel, which helps the government maintain highways and
provides consultancy to local authorities, had already this
month warned its full-year results would not meet analyst
expectations. [ID:nLDE69D0O7]

Oct 20, 2010

Outsourcers set for long-term gains from spending cuts

LONDON (Reuters) – Support services firms are set to make long-term gains from public spending cuts, analysts say, as the government enforces dramatic efficiencies across departments and slashes local authority budgets.

On Wednesday Chancellor George Osborne revealed the extent of the toughest spending cuts in a generation, as the coalition government seeks to reduce the country’s ballooning deficit.

Oct 20, 2010

Outsourcers set for long-term gains from UK cut

LONDON (Reuters) – British support services firms are set to make long-term gains from public spending cuts, analysts say, as the government enforces dramatic efficiencies across departments and slashes local authority budgets.

On Wednesday British finance minister George Osborne revealed the extent of the toughest spending cuts in a generation, as the coalition government seeks to reduce the country’s ballooning deficit.

Oct 11, 2010

EasyJet settles brand dispute with Stelios

LONDON, Oct 11 (Reuters) – Budget airliner easyJet (EZJ.L: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz)
reached an agreement with its founder and largest shareholder
Stelios Haji-Ioannou, allowing the no-frills carrier to keep
using the Stelios-owned brand name, ending a two-year dispute.

The deal also ends Haji-Ioannou’s — who is widely known as
Stelios — right to appoint himself as chairman of easyJet’s
board and will give the company more freedom to use the name and
enter co-branding agreements with other companies.

Oct 6, 2010

In Britain’s cities, the pain begins

LONDON (Reuters) – Inside Birmingham’s council chamber, a red-carpeted semi-circular room with Italian walnut-clad walls, the leader of Europe’s largest local government authority is preparing his colleagues for pain.

Over the past six years, Birmingham has cut more than 180 million pounds from the 1 billion pounds the council can spend, explains Mike Whitby, City Council Leader. “Now however, we need to find the same again, plus over 100 million pounds more, and all within less than four years.”

Oct 6, 2010

Special report: In Britain’s cities, the pain begins

LONDON (Reuters) – Inside Birmingham’s council chamber, a red-carpeted semi-circular room with Italian walnut-clad walls, the leader of Europe’s largest local government authority is preparing his colleagues for pain.

Over the past six years, Birmingham has cut more than 180 million pounds ($286 million) from the 1 billion pounds the council can spend, explains Mike Whitby, City Council Leader. “Now however, we need to find the same again, plus over 100 million pounds more, and all within less than four years.”

Sep 30, 2010

Rok names new FD, predecessor cleared in probe

LONDON, Sept 30 (Reuters) – British maintenance and building
firm Rok (ROK.L: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) named Sean Cummins as finance director on
Thursday to replace Ashley Martin, who resigned after being
cleared in an investigation into problems at a troubled unit.

Cummins joins from British design and engineering
consultancy Scott Wilson, where he was also finance director and
which is being taken over by U.S. group URS Corp (URS.N: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz).

May 21, 2010
via Afghan Journal

Where does Taliban reconciliation leave victims of war?

Photo

An Afghan boy in Afghanistan's southeastern Paktika province, November 2009. REUTERS/Bruno Domingos

The United States has signalled that it will gradually start withdrawing its troops from Afghanistan, after almost a decade fighting in the country, from July 2011. And so, perhaps driven by a sense of fear over what the absence of tens of thousands of foreign troops will mean for an already fragile security situation, the Afghan government is pursuing a policy of engaging the Taliban and other insurgent factions such as Hezb-i-Islami. It is a policy widely backed by officials and many members of parliament. It is a political means of seeking an end to the conflict, perhaps because the idea that Afghan security forces will be capable of doing the job of 100,000 foreign troops, is still unfathomable to many. But to many other Afghans it also represents a compromise which could see the country paring back the political developments it has achieved since 2001.

May 11, 2010
via Afghan Journal

On Afghan planes, women are “not able-bodied”

Photo

I was recently on a flight back from the western Afghan city of Herat. I was with a female friend, an American consultant who was in Herat compiling field research on civilian casualties. There was a ‘free seats’ policy on the Pamir Airways flight so my friend and I went to the first available empty row, which happened to be the exit row in the middle of the plane.

(REUTERS/Ahmad Masood)

As we went to sit down a clean-shaven flight attendant who looked like he was in his twenties told us we had to sit elsewhere. I asked why and he said “It’s for men only, no women, please sit here,” pointing to the next row behind. My friend and I looked at each other with disbelief. We both asked him again, why we couldn’t sit there and why being women prevented us from sitting there. Without any hesitation he said: “It’s for men and able bodied people only.” We were shocked.

Apr 2, 2010
via Afghan Journal

Why Karzai decided to attack the West

Photo

(REUTERS/Ahmad Masood)

It was a strange or at least unusual event. Reuters, other news wires and mostly Afghan journalists were summoned to the presidential palace early in the morning. A frequent and very familiar routine of standing around, waiting and multiple security checks then started .

On this occasion, we were packed onto mini buses with blacked-out windows and told only that we would be leaving the palace and going “some place outside”. The guessing game ended when the buses, flanked by armored Land Cruisers and charging down a busy city highway, honking other vehicles out of the way,  turned into another building very familiar to reporters in Kabul: the Independent Election Commission (IEC).

    • About Golnar

      "I'm a Reuters correspondent based in London, my home town, focused on covering British companies. Prior to this I was based in Reuters' Kabul bureau in Afghanistan where I wrote about the war, Afghan politics, women's rights and diplomacy."
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