Comments on: The art of the dying general at 250 years old http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/2009/09/10/the-art-of-the-dying-general-at-250-years-old/ Wed, 16 Nov 2016 01:37:11 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: Rhoops http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/2009/09/10/the-art-of-the-dying-general-at-250-years-old/comment-page-1/#comment-6728 Tue, 15 Sep 2009 07:48:32 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/?p=3189#comment-6728 S’funny, my wife’s Quebecoise, and I’m an English nationalist, and we have no diferences on Quebec. The ‘problem’ of Quebec aspirations is similar to that of the Cornish in Britain. A lot of hot air by the chatterers, and very little real substance.The problem if there is one, is that certain vested bureaucratic interests, prefer Stalinistic uniformity, and this attitude conflicts with the sensitiveties of dual culture/government. Good.

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By: The Bell http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/2009/09/10/the-art-of-the-dying-general-at-250-years-old/comment-page-1/#comment-6707 Sat, 12 Sep 2009 18:28:45 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/?p=3189#comment-6707 Art imitates Life in The Future.Our feathered friend echoing Rodin in the foreground seems to be thinking: “Maybe it’s time we made Single Payer, not War”

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By: Drew Kreutzweiser http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/2009/09/10/the-art-of-the-dying-general-at-250-years-old/comment-page-1/#comment-6703 Sat, 12 Sep 2009 12:43:50 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/?p=3189#comment-6703 Unfortunately there is a sentiment in Canada that permeates many: the notion that all our British founders were evil colonialists and the poor downtrodden were all victims. This attitude is likely drummed into young minds through our schools and Liberal media, where our colonial past is the only safe whipping boy in an overly politically correct society.Drew KreutzweiserOntario, Canada

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By: TeaLeaf http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/2009/09/10/the-art-of-the-dying-general-at-250-years-old/comment-page-1/#comment-6702 Sat, 12 Sep 2009 11:53:45 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/?p=3189#comment-6702 This is so interesting. The reference to Alexander Muir’s song “The Maple Leaf Forever” and the comment about unity ane diversity reminded me that some years ago the song was updated to reflect 20th century Canada.Here is what it says about that version at Wikipedia:”CBC Radio’s Metro Morning show in Toronto ran a controversial contest to find new lyrics for the song in 1997. The contest was won by Romanian immigrant, mathematician, and now a songwriter, actor and poet, Vladimir Radian, who came to Canada in the 1980s.”Another great Canadian sang yet another version at a hockey game and you can find that on You Tube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d45zJSHHw S8 (I think her name is spelled Anne MurrAy.)You can read the lyrics of the three versions (and the story of how Muir was inspired to write the original) at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Maple_L eaf_Forever

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By: krishnamurthi ramachandran http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/2009/09/10/the-art-of-the-dying-general-at-250-years-old/comment-page-1/#comment-6696 Fri, 11 Sep 2009 20:46:36 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/?p=3189#comment-6696 Dear Writer,Very good painting on Canada!s political history.I really admired it.Great painter with great,real notions.Yes. i have listened some tensions between French and English speaking origins in Canada.That pressing tensions were relieved by amicable manner.Canada shows Unity in Diversity.In India, many states,many languages, many social habits,many religions, many sub divisions among her own states,but,still India is a one country.Unity in Diversity is still cherishing and expanding.

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By: Fred http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/2009/09/10/the-art-of-the-dying-general-at-250-years-old/comment-page-1/#comment-6692 Fri, 11 Sep 2009 18:16:56 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/?p=3189#comment-6692 Being Canadian first and francophone second (Belgium origins). I’ve found it very disturbing after having been educated in the Anglophone side of Canada. To see the animosity from the Quebecois towards the “Englais”. They have such a special status that they have a opposition majority represented at the Federal level and yet only represent one province. And it appears not to be enough!By coincidence the same amount of friction exist in my country of origin in between the “Wallons” and “Flamant”. It seem that we do little in learning each other culture from an early age. And we use this lack of “education” as we mature as an excuse for nationalism and self-preservation.

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By: Canuckella http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/2009/09/10/the-art-of-the-dying-general-at-250-years-old/comment-page-1/#comment-6666 Thu, 10 Sep 2009 23:25:22 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/?p=3189#comment-6666 What a great post. I have always thought that this painting is a rather bizarre glorification of a colonial past that lead to the disenfranchisement of aboriginal peoples and the marginalisation of the cultures and languages of founding nations other than England and early immigrants. This author shows how this painting actually depicts the events and players that created the persistent solitudes and the tensions that may very well be one of Canada’s great strengths. Some peoples have paid a terrible price but the lessons our country learns as we continue to negotiate equality and diversity over these 250 years can only serve us well as we go forward.

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By: the Shah http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/2009/09/10/the-art-of-the-dying-general-at-250-years-old/comment-page-1/#comment-6656 Thu, 10 Sep 2009 17:42:19 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate-uk/?p=3189#comment-6656 Every American who thinks they can win ‘the hearts and minds’ of conquered people need only observe the pride of francophone quebecors to see that you never really can. While Canada hasn’t had violent struggles with our French population (well, Louis Riel never really fought a pitched battle and was captured in weeks, and the FLQ flared out after the Bourassa incident, so maybe one summer with a couple of bombings), the realtionship certainly isn’t overly warm in Quebec and the Maritimes.While I’m not sure what the point of the article here is, I think that anglophone Canada is happy to embrace the cultures that come to live here in the spirit of fellowship and freedom. The francophones do not embrace those other cultures because they feel it endangers their own, and the ‘special’ status it affords them in Canada. Even the French from France who come to live in Quebec find themselves set apart by francophone quebecors. Maybe that’s not the problem being discussed here, but I feel it’s one that should be acknowledged.

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