The Great Debate UK

from Breakingviews:

UK banks have much to fear from latest probe

July 18, 2014

By Chris Hughes

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate:

After MH17: The technical fix that could protect civilian airliners from missile attacks

July 18, 2014

Site of a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 plane crash is seen at the settlement of Grabovo in the Donetsk region

The awful crash of Malaysian Flight 17 in the eastern Ukraine combat zone seems likely to have been caused by a long-range surface-to-air missile. At this writing, who launched the missile remains undetermined. Regardless of who’s guilty -- why is a modern software-driven weapon capable of striking a civilian jet in the first place?

from Breakingviews:

London real estate at an inflection point

July 17, 2014

By George Hay

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Ian Bremmer:

World Cup chants reveal true state of U.S.-German relations

By Ian Bremmer
July 17, 2014

 Germany's national soccer players acknowledge their fans after their win over the U.S. at the end of their 2014 World Cup Group G soccer match at the Pernambuco arena in Recife

As Germany basks in its World Cup victory, it’s easy to forget that one of the most telling geopolitical moments of the tournament came during the Germany-U.S. game. As American fans chanted “U-S-A! U-S-A! U-S-A!” the Germans countered with, “N-S-A! N-S-A! N-S-A!”

from John Lloyd:

As Israel attacks Gaza, Jews elsewhere feel an impact

By John Lloyd
July 16, 2014

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As the death toll in Gaza rises, so does anger against Israel -- and sometimes, by extension, Jews -- in Europe and elsewhere.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Nothing pacific about it: Japan pushes back on China

By Nicholas Wapshott
July 15, 2014

Members of Japan's Self-Defence Forces' airborne troops stand at attention during the annual SDF troop review ceremony at Asaka Base in Asaka

China is on the march. Or, to be precise, China has made a strong push, militarily and otherwise, into seas nearby, setting off alarms among its neighbors. Now Japan has pushed back, announcing it will “reinterpret” its pacifist constitution so it can be more militarily aggressive in responding to China’s persistent territorial expansionism.

from The Great Debate:

Harry’s still Potter-ing around, but Hermione is my true hero

By Chloe Angyal
July 14, 2014

 CHILDREN READ THE NEW HARRY POTTER BOOK AFTER ITS RELEASE IN SYDNEY.

Last week, Harry Potter author J. K. Rowling broke the Internet. Or rather, she broke the website Pottermore, a hub for her fans, when she posted a short new story about the boy who reshaped young adult literature and defined popular culture for a decade.

from The Great Debate:

U.S. spying on Germany: Making enemies out of allies, and for what?

By David Wise
July 11, 2014

German Chancellor Merkel attends a session of Bundestag in Berlin

What were they thinking?

In the wake of last fall's revelation that the National Security Agency had wiretapped German Chancellor Angela Merkel's cell phone, the report of U.S. intelligence’s involvement in two other likely cases of spying on Germany is mind-boggling.

from The Great Debate:

Netanyahu hopes to avoid Gaza ground operation. Why he might order one anyway.

By Dan Ephron
July 10, 2014

An Israeli soldier rests atop a tank stationed on a field outside the central Gaza Strip

To understand whether Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu intends to send ground troops into Gaza, it might help to scrutinize one of his decisions from this week.

from John Lloyd:

Here’s who should be watching the watchers

By John Lloyd
July 9, 2014

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The files stolen from the National Security Agency by Edward Snowden, the quiet American who has turned the security world inside out, drip out week by week – in The Guardian, on the new website The Intercept, financed by eBay founder Pierre Omidyar, in the German weekly Spiegel and in the Washington Post. The last of these outlets had the latest installment on Monday. It told us that “ordinary Internet users, American and non-American alike” had been swept into the NSA’s computers in far greater numbers than foreigners reasonably suspected of possible terrorist links.