The Great Debate UK

from Commentaries:

Tech results give few clues to economy: Eric Auchard

Windows 7 touchscreen demonstrationBy Eric Auchard

LONDON, July 24 (Reuters) - Investors have proved all too ready to interpret positive earnings trends from Intel, IBM and Apple as signs of economic recovery and to justify a continued rally in technology stocks.

Now they are taking the wrong lessons in reverse by reading disappointing results from Microsoft Corp as evidence that a nascent rebound in the economy has stalled.

By the same token, it's mistaken to read the best quarterly results in two-and-a-half years for Samsung Electronics, the world's biggest maker of memory chips, as any indicator of progress on the economic front.

Look past the headlines and you'll find factors specific to each of these companies that say little about any fresh demand for technology in this economy.

from The Great Debate:

How Apple can take bite of business market

Eric Auchard-- Eric Auchard is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

Apple Inc is taking steps to make its computers run on corporate networks, but these moves fall far short of ensuring Mac users win equal standing in business.

Full corporate access for Apple computers inside businesses remains years away. If and when it comes, acceptance is more than likely to be the result of broad trends reshaping the office computer market, rather than Apple's own product genius.

New iPhone small step towards global domination

Photo
-

tom_dunmore-Tom Dunmore is editor-in-chief of Stuff magazine. The opinions expressed are his own.-

Yesterday, Apple unveiled the latest version of its wildly popular iPhone. And it was quite a show, despite the absence of Apple’s usual ringmaster Steve Jobs.

from The Great Debate:

Are a CEO’s health problems a private matter?

dr-jgsm-05-- Dana Radcliffe is a Day Family senior lecturer of business ethics at the Johnson School at Cornell University. The views expressed are his own. --

Are a CEO’s health problems a private matter? Or does he or she have an obligation to disclose them to investors and other stakeholders?

from The Great Debate:

What Apple loses without Steve

steve_jobs


-- Eric Auchard is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

"There's probably no God" runs the slogan of an advertising campaign humanists are running on buses across Britain. But if the supreme being has his doubters, few question the importance of Steve Jobs to Apple Inc.

In a letter to employees on Wednesday, the Apple co-founder said he would take himself "out of the limelight" for six months after learning in the past week that his still vaguely defined "health issues" are "more complex than I originally thought."

Can anyone stop the dominance of iTunes?

Photo
-

**Tom Dunmore is Editor-in-Chief of Stuff magazine. The views expressed are his own.**

tomdunmoreeicstuffmagazine2Amazon’s music download service has finally arrived in the UK. That’s great news for music fans, who will benefit from lower prices and greater choice – but it’s not going to save the music industry from the dominance of iTunes.

  •