The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

Secrecy’s out, so here’s what Swiss banks can still offer

By Peter Gumbel
May 22, 2014

brady555

If Swiss banks were to cast off their usual discretion and make a marketing pitch these days, it might start off something like this:

How will the privatisation of RBS and Lloyds affect gilt supply?

By Guest Contributor
June 4, 2013

–Sam Hill is UK Fixed Income Strategist at RBC Capital Markets. The opinions expressed are his own.–

from The Great Debate:

A blueprint to make banks behave

By Jermyn Brooks
March 5, 2013

Banking integrity has become an oxymoron. Top bankers need to change this and take responsibility for tackling ethical issues. For this to happen, every part of the organization – from senior management to human resources managers to those on the trading floor and beyond – should be assessed according to the contribution it makes to promoting ethical values, not just the bottom line.

from James Saft:

Britain eats (leverages) its young

November 22, 2011

James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Four years, several failed banks and at least one global recession later, Britain has finally discovered what its young people need: 19-1 leverage.

from Felix Salmon:

Lagarde leads from the front on Europe

By Felix Salmon
August 30, 2011

Going into the Jackson Hole conference, everybody was breathlessly awaiting Friday's speech from Ben Bernanke, which turned out to be incredibly boring. The most important speech of the meeting, by far, came on Saturday, and came from the new head of the IMF, Christine Lagarde. In decidedly undiplomatic prose she came right out and said what needed to be done:

from Felix Salmon:

Why the Fed needs to replace bark with bite

By Felix Salmon
June 30, 2011

Antony Currie has a response today to those who say that the Fed's U-turn on swipe fees "makes it look as if it can be cowed by the kind of intense lobbying the banks unleashed." (Yes, that would be me.)

from Felix Salmon:

Greenspan squanders his final reserve of credibility

By Felix Salmon
March 30, 2011

Thank you, internet: Henry Farrell and his commenters have all the snark so desperately required in response to Alan Greenspan's ludicrous op-ed in the FT. And they're not alone: as Alex Eichler notes, "everyone is laughing at Alan Greenspan today". Greenspan could hardly have made himself look like more of an idiot if he'd tried, not only because the "notably rare exceptions" construction is so inherently snarkworthy, but also because it's so boneheadedly stupid. Anything which normally makes money is a good idea if you ignore the times that it doesn't work.

The silent revolution in banking

By Guest Contributor
February 17, 2011

Sanjeev-SinhaBy Sanjeev Sinha

Media coverage of the banking industry was once confined to newspapers’ business pages, but has now spilled over to headline coverage. Recently the remuneration of bankers has been treated with even more interest than the salaries of top football players.

from Felix Salmon:

Goldman’s Facebook plan falls apart

By Felix Salmon
January 17, 2011

When the news came out that Goldman Sachs was orchestrating a private offering of Facebook shares at a $50 billion valuation, those shares overnight became an even hotter commodity than they had been up to that point. Check out the results of the periodic SecondMarket auctions: the three auctions in December, before the Goldman news was public, cleared at between $21.01 and $22.75 per share. The first auction after the Goldman news, by contrast, cleared at an all-time record of $28.26 per share -- that's a valuation of over $70 billion.

from Felix Salmon:

Dealing with Britain’s overpaid bankers

By Felix Salmon
January 13, 2011

Bagehot has a very odd column about Britain's overpaid bankers. Part of it is spot on: