The Great Debate UK

from Commentaries:

‘Living wills’ easier said than done

In the wake of the widespread chaos that accompanied the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers last September, regulators have sought to find a better way to unwind global financial giants. One approach is that the banks themselves should prepare for their own orderly demise -- a kind of "living will".

That idea has been gathering steam of late. The G20 group of finance ministers and central bankers meeting in London over the weekend agreed to require "systemic firms to develop firm-specific contingency plans."

The concept has wide appeal. The crisis has convinced politicians and regulators of all colours that even large financial institutions must be allowed to fail without imposing a huge burden on taxpayers. Many bankers see such a regime as a preferable alternative to more intrusive regulation.

However, drawing up a detailed "living will" is easier said than done.

Simon Gleeson of Clifford Chance argues that it is more important for regulators and legislators to establish a cross-border crisis-management and resolution regime than it is for individual firms to prepare for their own demise.

Tiptoeing toward economic recovery after Lehman

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david-andrews

- David Andrews is director of David Andrews Media, a financial public relations consultancy with high profile fund management and financial services clients based in the UK, Ireland, Cayman Islands, Cape Verde, Beijing, Europe and the U.S. The opinions expressed are his own. -

David is a former financial journalist best known for his weekly Daily Express and Conde Nast ‘Money Matters’ columns.
Few will be lifting a glass to toast the first anniversary of the collapse of investment bank Lehman Brothers a year ago this week. With billions of dollars under management and thought to be invincible, the private bank was generally regarded as a potential gateway to the riches of Croessus for the ordained Masters of the Universe who prowled its Jackson Pollock-lined corridors.

from Commentaries:

Stones and glass houses, offshore tax haven edition

One of the week's more amusing stories takes us to the sun-kissed shores of the Cayman Islands, scuba diver's paradise, magnet for hedge funds and - until very recently - world-beating tax haven.

The financial crisis has not been kind to the Caymans. Hundreds of hedge funds have collapsed and global banks have slashed jobs. As if this was not enough, President Barack Obama in the spring launched a crackdown on tax havens that forced a number of Caribbean islands, including the Caymans, to embrace greater transparency - after a fashion.

from Commentaries:

Lehman D-Day

It's taken awhile, but a deadline for filing claims in the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy has finally been set and it's Sept. 22.

A Sept. 15 deadline, the one-year anniversary of Lehman's collapse, would have been more appropriate. But maybe that would have just been rubbing everyone's face in it.

GM: Chapter 11 or bust

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David Bailey- Professor David Bailey works at the Coventry University Business School and has written extensively on globalisation, economic restructuring and industrial policy, with particular reference to the auto industry. The opinions expressed are his own. -

GM declared itself bankrupt on Monday in one of the largest bankruptcies in U.S. history, in an attempt to seek protection from creditors.

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