The Great Debate UK

Post stress tests: lending conditions likely to remain tough

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SnipImage-Jane Foley is research director at Forex.com. The opinions expressed are her own.-

The financial markets have been pre-occupied with all aspects of the EU bank stress tests over the past few weeks.
For the man on the street, however, the debate boils down to just one question: when will credit become cheaper and more readily available?

The Bank of England recently reported that the stock of lending to business contracted by £2.3 billion in May.  Data from major UK lenders has indicated that net lending remained weak in June.

The lack of new credit is frequently blamed for stifling the pace of economic recovery.

Not much stress, not much test

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-Laurence Copeland is professor of finance at Cardiff University Business School. The opinions expressed are his own.-

Back in the 1950’s, when most women stayed at home while their menfolk went out to work, a favourite trick of life insurance salesmen was to walk into the prospect’s home at dinner time and ask the wife:

from Breakingviews:

What’s your bonus really worth?

By Hugo Dixon and George Hay

What's a bonus really worth? Under new European rules, bankers will see part of their bonuses retained, another chunk deferred and some may also be clawed back. The present value of a $1 million bonus could be cut to less than $800,000, according to Reuters Breakingviews calculations.

The starting point is how much the banker gets immediately in cash. The new rules specify that 40-60 percent of the bonus must be deferred for three to five years and at least half of the non-deferred portion must be non-cash. That means there's a maximum of 30 percent upfront cash. But for bankers on big bonuses -- and $1 million would presumably be in that category -- at least 60 percent must be deferred. The cap on upfront cash, therefore, is 20 percent, or $200,000.

Osborne unveils a momentous project

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BRITAIN-BUDGET/

-Laurence Copeland is a professor of finance at Cardiff University Business School. The opinions expressed are his own.

We were promised a Budget that would be a game-changer, and that’s exactly what we got today – ambitious, dramatic, and presented with conviction and confidence (as it needed to be).
The Chancellor had four objectives in view:

Banks, borrowing, bonds and Britain’s budget

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BRITAIN/

-Laurence Copeland is a professor of finance at Cardiff University Business School and a co-author of “Verdict on the Crash” published by the Institute of Economic Affairs. The opinions expressed are his own. Join Reuters for a live discussion with guests as UK Chancellor George Osborne makes  an emergency budget statement at 12:30 p.m. British time on Tuesday, June 22, 2010.-

George Osborne must be thankful to Don Fabio and his boys for ensuring that Wednesday’s tabloids will have other things to think about than the Budget, because it is going to be one of the toughest ever.

Breaking up banks is no silver bullet

– Hugo Dixon is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own –

Breaking up the banks is no silver bullet. Politicians on both sides of the Atlantic — including two of the party leaders fighting the UK election — want to separate so-called casino investment banks from utility lenders. But such simple rules would create arbitrage opportunities and rigidities without curbing excess risk-taking.

UK should resist temptation to dump bank stakes

– George Hay is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own –

The UK’s forced investments in the banking sector are in rude health. The 41 percent holding in Lloyds Banking Group and 70 percent stake in Royal Bank of Scotland are comfortably above where the government bought the equity. But that doesn’t mean whoever wins next week’s general election should charge into a sale.

Tight UK election is bad news for bankers

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– Peter Thal Larsen is aBRITAIN/ Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own –

Britain’s bankers were already braced for an uncomfortable election. But the U.S. fraud allegations against Goldman Sachs, combined with the rise of the Liberal Democrats, have given bank-bashing renewed impetus. The popularity of the attacks means they could resonate well beyond the current campaign.

Punishing investment bankers: the nanny-state goes global

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Laurence_Copeland- Laurence Copeland is a professor of finance at Cardiff University Business School and a co-author of “Verdict on the Crash” published by the Institute of Economic Affairs. The opinions expressed are his own. -

In a previous blog, I expressed the fear that in the aftermath of the financial crisis we were going to see either the innocent punished or guilty men convicted of the wrong crimes, or maybe both.

Greenspan and the curse of counterfactual

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Laurence_Copeland-150x150- Laurence Copeland is a professor of finance at Cardiff University Business School and a co-author of “Verdict on the Crash” published by the Institute of Economic Affairs. The opinions expressed are his own. -

Suppose that, instead of appeasing Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler at Munich in 1938, Neville Chamberlain had taken Britain to war, what would today’s history books say about the episode?

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