The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

Why Russia’s turn to China is a mirage

By Björn Düben
July 8, 2015

Russia's President Putin welcomes China's President Xi Jinping during their meeting at Kremlin in Moscow

Russia's President Vladimir Putin (L) welcomes China's President Xi Jinping during their meeting at the Kremlin in Moscow May 8, 2015. REUTERS/Alexander Zemlianichenko

from The Great Debate:

The myth of China’s ghost cities

By Wade Shepard
April 22, 2015

thamesvillage

Thames Town, near Shanghai, China. REUTERS/Courtesy of Wade Shepard

Ghost towns tend to start as boomtowns, and contemporary China more than likely has more boomtowns than any other country in history. No economy has ever risen so rapidly and no place has ever built so much so quickly. This rapid growth has resulted in peculiar side effect: ghost cities, everywhere.

from The Great Debate:

Slowing economy won’t alter Xi’s ‘China Dream’

By John Lloyd
April 16, 2015

A picture taken with a tilt-shift lens shows Chinese President Xi seen on a screen inside the Great Hall of the People during the opening session of the CPPCC in Beijing

A picture taken with a tilt-shift lens shows Chinese President Xi Jinping seen on a screen inside the Great Hall of the People during the opening session of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) in Beijing, March 3, 2015. REUTERS/Jason Lee

from The Great Debate:

Years after the famine, here’s how North Koreans really get by

By James Pearson and Daniel Tudor
April 13, 2015

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un gives field guidance during a visit to the November 2 Factory of the Korean People's Army (KPA)

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un smiles as he gives field guidance during a visit to the November 2 Factory of the Korean People's Army (KPA) in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang, August 24, 2014. REUTERS/KCNA

from The Great Debate:

U.S. and India: Two democracies can join to balance China’s rise

By Jon Huntsman Jr. and Bharath Gopalaswamy
January 25, 2015

U.S. President Obama and Indian Prime Minister Modi arrive for a photo opportunity ahead of their meeting at Hyderabad House in New Delhi

President Barack Obama and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi (R) arrive for a photo opportunity ahead of their meeting at Hyderabad House in New Delhi, Jan. 25, 2015. REUTERS/Adnan Abidi

from The Great Debate:

A misconception that could scuttle nuclear talks with Iran

By Jim Walsh and Aron Bernstein
November 24, 2014

EU envoy Ashton, Britain's Foreign Secretary Hammond and Iranian Foreign Minister Zarif sit at a table during talks in Vienna

As nuclear talks between Iran and the other members of the so-called P5+1 group are extended for another seven months, one issue is sure to remain a sticking point. The most important differences between all sides relates to the size of Iran’s uranium-enrichment program.

from The Great Debate:

Are ‘Hong Kong people’ still Chinese? Depends on how you define ‘Chinese’

By Alan Chin
September 30, 2014

A protester sleeps under an umbrella as she blocks a street outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong

“Hong Kong people! Hong Kong people!” shouted tens of thousands of Occupy Central demonstrators on the streets of downtown Hong Kong as they braved police pepper spray and tear gas this weekend. So simple and self-evident, the slogan gets to the heart of the matter, because beyond the immediate causes of contention are the much larger existential issues of who gets to define just exactly what it means to be part of China, and to be Chinese.

from Ian Bremmer:

World Cup chants reveal true state of U.S.-German relations

By Ian Bremmer
July 17, 2014

 Germany's national soccer players acknowledge their fans after their win over the U.S. at the end of their 2014 World Cup Group G soccer match at the Pernambuco arena in Recife

As Germany basks in its World Cup victory, it’s easy to forget that one of the most telling geopolitical moments of the tournament came during the Germany-U.S. game. As American fans chanted “U-S-A! U-S-A! U-S-A!” the Germans countered with, “N-S-A! N-S-A! N-S-A!”

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Nothing pacific about it: Japan pushes back on China

By Nicholas Wapshott
July 15, 2014

Members of Japan's Self-Defence Forces' airborne troops stand at attention during the annual SDF troop review ceremony at Asaka Base in Asaka

China is on the march. Or, to be precise, China has made a strong push, militarily and otherwise, into seas nearby, setting off alarms among its neighbors. Now Japan has pushed back, announcing it will “reinterpret” its pacifist constitution so it can be more militarily aggressive in responding to China’s persistent territorial expansionism.

from The Great Debate:

Eyewitness Views: From hope to horror in Tiananmen Square

By Alan Chin
May 29, 2014


Eyewitness View: From hope to horror in Tiananmen Square On Changan Avenue, a small crowd confronts the People's Liberation Army (PLA) in Tiananmen Square after the army stormed the square and the surrounding area the night before. This is near the location a day later where "Tank Man" confronted and momentarily halted a column of the army's tanks leaving the square. (Alan Chin)June 4, 1989. In Chinese the reference is usually made with just the numbers “Six Four,” like in English, “9/11.” As the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen ...

View "Eyewitness View: From hope to horror in Tiananmen Square" on Spundge