The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

Alexander Litvinenko and Karl Marx’s stepchildren

By John Lloyd
January 27, 2016

Marina Litvinenko, the widow of murdered KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko, attends a demonstration in support of Boris Nemtsov, former deputy prime minister of Russia and prominent critic of Vladimir Putin, outside the Russian Embassy in London March 01, 2015. Nemstov was murdered two days ago as he walked across a bridge near the Kremlin in Moscow. REUTERS/Neil Hall (BRITAIN - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) - RTR4RN56

Marina Litvinenko, the widow of murdered KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko. REUTERS/Neil Hall

from The Great Debate:

Why China, a geopolitical teenager, is finally growing up

By Peter Marino
December 16, 2015

A woman walks past corrugated iron fencing at a Chinese construction site in Kenya's capital Nairobi September 2, 2015. Picture taken September 2, 2015. To match CHINA-AFRICA/ REUTERS/Noor Khamis - RTX1WHJ6

A woman walks past corrugated iron fencing at a Chinese construction site in Kenya's capital Nairobi September 2, 2015. REUTERS/Noor Khamis

from The Great Debate:

Syria, Yemen, Libya — one factor unites these failed states, and it isn’t religion

By Jack Goldstone
November 30, 2015

Sheikh Ghazi Rashad Hrimis touches dried earth in the parched region of Raqqa province in eastern Syria, November 11, 2010. Lack of rain and mismanagement of the land and water resources have forced up to half of million people to flee the region in one of Syria's largest internal migrations since France and Britain carved the country out of the former Ottoman Empire in 1920.     REUTERS/Khaled al-Hariri (SYRIA - Tags: AGRICULTURE ENVIRONMENT) - RTXUR9R

Sheikh Ghazi Rashad Hrimis touches dried earth in the parched region of Raqqa province in eastern Syria, November 11, 2010. REUTERS/Khaled al-Hariri

from The Great Debate:

Cybersecurity treaties may be nice, but it’s really every country for itself

By Robert Litwak and Meg King
November 11, 2015

U.S. Marine Sergeant Michael Kidd works on a computer at ECPI University in Virginia Beach, Virginia, February 7, 2012. Cyberspace was a hobby for Kidd before he joined the Marines in 2003, but he hopes to make it his new battlefield after suffering debilitating injuries in Iraq. At the naval air station in Virginia Beach, Virginia, the 26-year-old from Williamsburg is retraining to fight cyber threats, one of a number of wounded warriors transitioning to non-traditional combat fields in order to continue serving the United States' defense needs. Picture taken February 7, 2012.  REUTERS/Samantha Sais (UNITED STATES - Tags: MILITARY EDUCATION) - RTR2XOOE

U.S. Marine Sergeant Michael Kidd works on a computer at ECPI University in Virginia Beach, Virginia, February 7, 2012. REUTERS/Samantha Sais

from The Great Debate:

The three gravest threats facing our world

By John Lloyd
October 18, 2015

Residents walk through the Breezy Point neighborhood which was left devastated by Hurricane Sandy in the New York borough of Queens

Residents walk through the Breezy Point neighborhood which was left devastated by Hurricane Sandy in the New York borough of Queens, November 12, 2012. REUTERS/Adrees Latif

from The Great Debate:

The other deepwater battleground

By Peter Marino
October 7, 2015

A floating dock of the Indian navy is pictured at the naval base at Port Blair in Andaman and Nicobar Islands

A floating dock of the Indian navy is pictured at the naval base at Port Blair in Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India, July 1, 2015. REUTERS/Sanjeev Miglani

from The Great Debate:

The real reason China’s leader jailed so many of his peers

By William Johnson
September 25, 2015

Still image of Zhou Yongkang, China's former domestic security chief, sitting between his police escorts as he listens to his sentence in a court in Tianjin

Zhou Yongkang, China's former domestic security chief, sits between his police escorts as he listens to his sentence in a court in Tianjin, China, in this still image taken from video provided by China Central Television and shot on June 11, 2015. REUTERS/China Central Television via REUTERS TV

from The Great Debate:

What the blow up between North and South Korea may really have been about

By William Johnson
August 24, 2015

North Koreans who signed up to join the army train in the midst of political tension with South Korea, in this undated photo released by North Korea's KCNA in Pyongyang

North Koreans who signed up to join the army train in the midst of political tension with South Korea, in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) in Pyongyang August 23, 2015.

from The Great Debate:

Why Russia’s turn to China is a mirage

By Björn Düben
July 8, 2015

Russia's President Putin welcomes China's President Xi Jinping during their meeting at Kremlin in Moscow

Russia's President Vladimir Putin (L) welcomes China's President Xi Jinping during their meeting at the Kremlin in Moscow May 8, 2015. REUTERS/Alexander Zemlianichenko

from The Great Debate:

The myth of China’s ghost cities

By Wade Shepard
April 22, 2015

thamesvillage

Thames Town, near Shanghai, China. REUTERS/Courtesy of Wade Shepard

Ghost towns tend to start as boomtowns, and contemporary China more than likely has more boomtowns than any other country in history. No economy has ever risen so rapidly and no place has ever built so much so quickly. This rapid growth has resulted in peculiar side effect: ghost cities, everywhere.