The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

Mickey’s Magic needed for Disneyland Shanghai

By Wei Gu
November 4, 2009

WeiGucrop.jpg-- Wei Gu is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are her own --

China has finally given a green light for Disneyland to build a theme park in Shanghai. Negotiations that started when Bill Clinton was in the White House have concluded just before President Barack Obama is due to visit. The approval looks like a coup for Walt Disney Co, but it will take all of Mickey's magic to prevent the park from becoming another government-financed loss maker.

from Breakingviews:

EU looks lonely on climate high ground

By Paul Taylor
November 2, 2009

icebergNegotiations to save the planet from catastrophic climate change are heading for trouble, five weeks before a crucial U.N. conference in Copenhagen.

from The Great Debate:

Imagine when China runs a trade deficit

By Wei Gu
September 28, 2009

WeiGucrop.jpg-- Wei Gu is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are her own --

If current trends continue, China might swing to a trade deficit in the not-too-distant future. Given that China has enjoyed more than a decade of strong exports, this may sound a bit far-fetched. But even if it happens, this would not necessarily be something for the world to worry about.

from The Great Debate:

Global rebalancing to weaken dollar, quietly

September 24, 2009

-- Neal Kimberley is an FX market analyst for Reuters. The opinions expressed are his own --forex

from Commentaries:

Rethinking carbon diplomacy

September 22, 2009

Climate change was initially billed in a leading role at the G20 meeting in Pittsburgh. Now it looks set to make the briefest of cameo appearances.

from The Great Debate:

Global imbalances: out with a bang?

September 22, 2009

jamessaft1.jpg(James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own)

The simplest way to end the imbalances in the world's economy is also sadly perhaps the most likely: for the Chinese to stop buying U.S. debt.

from Commentaries:

Is Goldman’s Chinese convertible really a taxi?

September 21, 2009

BRITAIN/The number of London's trademark black taxis booked and waiting outside the European headquarters of Goldman Sachs -- meters running -- was once used by some as a barometer of the health of London's investment banking business.

from The Great Debate:

For Chinese exporters, grass is greener abroad

September 17, 2009

WeiGucrop.jpg- Wei Gu is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are her own. -

The U.S.-China tire dispute threatens to spill into other sectors and squeeze Chinese exporters' already razor-thin margins further. It might seem mind-boggling to many that Chinese manufacturers are still hanging on to weak overseas markets even though the domestic economy looks much healthier and surely offers more potential.

from The Great Debate:

China’s coming magnificent bubble

September 17, 2009

jamessaft1.jpg--James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own--

If and when China makes its currency convertible and opens its financial system the stage will be set for a bubble that should make the dotcom and housing booms look tame.

from The Great Debate:

Five overlooked global risks

September 15, 2009

Rafael Ramirez is James Martin Senior Research Fellow in Futures at Oxford University's Institute for Science, Innovation and Society. His latest book is "Business Planning for Turbulent Times: New Methods for Applying Scenarios" edited with John W. Selsky and Kees van der Heijden. -- Rafael Ramírez is the James Martin Senior Research Fellow in Futures at Oxford University and author of "Business Planning for Turbulent Times: New Methods for Applying Scenarios" edited with John W. Selsky and Kees van der Heijden. Ramírez attended a session at the World Economic Forum's gathering in Dalian, China, on managing global risks.