The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

U.S., China and eating soup with a fork

By Bernd Debusmann
October 29, 2010

-The opinions expressed are the author's own-

Are economists the world over using an outdated tool to measure economic progress?

from Chrystia Freeland:

Why emerging market countries have an edge

By Chrystia Freeland
October 29, 2010

Tony Hsieh and Sanjay Madan wrote the program to create LinkExchange over a weekend. Before the following weekend, they had more than a dozen websites participating in their ad-sharing network. Over the next several weeks they worked frantically on the project. They refined their business in real time, learning—quickly!—from their mistakes. Less than a year later, the Harvard grads were offered $1 million (U.S.) for the company. Less than a year after that, they sold it for $265 million.

Is there a way out of the currency war?

October 27, 2010

CHINA-USA/CURRENCY-WARCompetitive devaluation is no longer a possible danger – it is already here. Many people are worried that, after global stock market crashes and a collapse of most of the world’s banking system, a war over exchange rates completes a sequence of events that looks awfully like a rerun of the 1930’s. There is however one crucial difference. The Chinese role certainly makes matters more complicated, though it is as yet unclear whether it makes the outlook better or worse.

from Breakingviews:

Beijing’s keep-’em-guessing approach has flaws

October 21, 2010

Two days before Thursday's strong inflation figures, the People's Bank of China surprised with a rate hike. Global markets sold off, but quickly recovered. The effect of conducting monetary policy through short sharp shocks is waning. It looks time for a well-explained, concerted plan to fight rising prices.

from Chrystia Freeland:

‘We can’t inflate our way to prosperity’

By Chrystia Freeland
October 12, 2010

"There is no other policy tool available [besides quantitative easing],"' Laura Tyson, a former chairwoman of the Council of Economic Advisors, said at this morning's Reuters/YouTube live debate on how to fix the economy. Tyson argues that additional Fed purchases of long-term bonds is the most viable way to energize the U.S. economy since a new fiscal stimulus bill is unlikely to pass Congress:

Why the world needs a weaker dollar

By Guest Contributor
October 8, 2010

IRAN-CURRENCY/RATE/Kathleen Brooks is research director at forex.com. The opinions expressed are her own.

from MacroScope:

Will China make the world green?

October 5, 2010

Workers remove mine slag at an aluminium plant in Zibo, Shandong province December 6, 2008. REUTERS/Stringer

Joschka Fischer was never one to mince words when he was Germany's foreign minister in the late '90s and early noughts. So it is not overly surprising that he has painted a picture in a new post of a world with only two powers -- the United States and China -- and an ineffective and divided Europe on the sidelines.

from Breakingviews:

U.S. trade thaw may leave China out in cold

September 30, 2010

The retaliatory China currency bill passed in the U.S. House helps brand this Congress as one of the more protectionist in years. The next one might switch gears and embrace trade by passing several stalled pacts. But Beijing shouldn't expect that to translate into a friendlier Washington.

from Chrystia Freeland:

Rise of the rest

By Chrystia Freeland
September 30, 2010

Get ready for the next wave of globalization. The emergence of the emerging markets is old news, of course: after all, Tom Friedman discovered that the world was flat back in 2005. But even as much of the developed world is struggling with weak consumer demand and stubbornly high levels of unemployment, the emerging market countries are writing a new chapter in the story of the global economy.

from The Great Debate:

Speculators and China win big on yen move

By J Saft
September 15, 2010

What does $4 trillion a day in business, never sleeps and sees Japan's Ministry of Finance as just one more patsy?