The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

Time to stand up to the banking lobby

Christopher Swann-- Christopher Swann is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own --

The crusading spirit that at one stage threatened to lead to the nationalization of U.S. banks and the downfall of their top executives now seems like ancient history.

Banks are again flexing their muscles and have turned the tables on America's politicians. Remarkably, policy makers now seem to be struggling to secure even a modicum of needed change in the regulatory system.

The winter's paroxysm of public anger has dissipated with astonishing speed. This is in spite of the fact that economic recovery still seems a distant goal and the woes of CIT Group suggest that even the financial system is not out of the woods. As a result there is now a real danger that the administration and Congress will fail to live up to Rahm Emanuel's famous injunction never to let a crisis go to waste.

The ability of the financial lobby to hold onto its political power has been one of the great mysteries of the crisis. Few special interest groups have shown such  flexibility in their logic.

from The Great Debate:

Stress test the consumer

Christopher Swann-- Christopher Swann is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own --

People can be divided into three classes, it has been said: the haves, the have-nots and the have-not-paid-for-what-they-haves. The prevalence of the third category may be the biggest single source of vulnerability for the U.S. recovery.

A stress test of the consumer could reveal more distressing results than the one conducted on the banking system.

from The Great Debate:

Learning to love falling house prices

Christopher Swann-- Christopher Swann is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own --

Optimism has been all but extinguished from the U.S. housing market.

The number of Americans lining up for new home loans is shrinking again, according to Wednesday's release from the Mortgage Bankers Association, and the best that can be said of homebuilding is that it has stabilized at almost 80 percent below its peak.

With no end in sight to falling prices, perhaps we should look on the bright side. Indeed, there are three good reasons why sliding prices are not such a bad thing.

from The Great Debate:

The Fed needs to get its wallet out

Christopher Swann-- Christopher Swann is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own --

The Federal Reserve is putting on a brave face about the rise in Treasury yields.

At the moment, the Fed can afford to put off bringing out the big cannons for a little while. If market optimism is overdone, a few weak economic releases would soon send interest rates plunging again. If the market is right, then higher rates are justified and the economy will cope.

  •