The Great Debate UK

Companies would be foolish to ignore the Bribery Act

By Guest Contributor
June 30, 2011

By Philip Urofsky and Josanne Rickard. The opinions expressed are their own.

The new Bribery Act, which comes into force on July 1, exposes British companies and other companies doing business in the UK to prosecution under its broad and somewhat undefined provisions. The risks it presents, although perhaps overblown by some commentators and practitioners, are nevertheless significant.

from Global News Journal:

Croatia must read European Union signals carefully

November 12, 2010

The European Commission told Croatia this week that its negotiations to join the European Union have reached their "final" stage. Sounds promising, considering how reluctant many EU governments are to admit any new members at a time when the bloc is coping with financial difficulties.

from Afghan Journal:

Afghan election: Industrial-scale corruption, or real hope?

August 29, 2010

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What is a worse prospect for an Afghanistan election – election fraud on an industrial scale or a quiet campaign of intimidation that keeps voters away from the polls, or forces them to vote for the most powerful candidate?
That seems to be the choice facing many Afghan voters ahead of the Sept. 18 parliamentary election, particularly those in the Pashtun tribal belt in the south and east where so much of the fraud that marred last year’s presidential ballot was committed.

from UK News:

Echoes of Italy’s Clean Hands revolution

May 18, 2009

The shockwaves reverberating through Westminster as the MPs' expenses scandal unfolds have been compared with the "Clean Hands" bribery scandal that effectively demolished Italy's post-war political establishment in the space of a couple of years in the early 1990s.

from Africa News blog:

Time to stop aid for Africa? An argument against

By Reuters Staff
February 23, 2009

Earlier this month, Zambian economist Dambisa Moyo argued that Africa needs Western countries to cut long term aid that has brought dependency, distorted economies and fuelled bureaucracy and corruption. The comments on the blog posting suggested that many readers agreed. In a response, Savio Carvalho, Uganda country director for aid agency Oxfam GB, says that aid can help the continent escape poverty - if done in the right way:

from Africa News blog:

Time to stop aid for Africa?

February 5, 2009

Far from being all bad news for Africa, the global financial crisis is a chance to break a dependence on development aid that has kept it in poverty, argues Zambian economist Dambisa Moyo, who has just published a new book “Dead Aid”.