The Great Debate UK

from Hugo Dixon:

Greek election may reopen can of worms

By Hugo Dixon
August 31, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews guest columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Hugo Dixon:

Greek deal leaves bitter aftertaste

By Hugo Dixon
July 13, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews guest columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Hugo Dixon:

Greece will struggle to stay in euro

By Hugo Dixon
July 5, 2015

An anti-austerity 'No' voter waves a flag with the name of Prime Minister Tsipras as he celebrate the results of the first exit polls in Athens

An anti-austerity 'No' voter waves a flag with the name of Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras as he celebrate the results of the first exit polls in Athens, Greece, July 5, 2015. REUTERS/Marko Djurica

from Hugo Dixon:

Greeks choose between bad and terrible

By Hugo Dixon
July 2, 2015

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

The Greeks have to choose between the bad and the truly ugly in Sunday’s referendum. If I was Greek - and I’m not, although I speak the language and had a Greek great-grandmother - I would plump for the bad option, voting “Yes”.

from Hugo Dixon:

Tsipras looks like he is crumbling

By Hugo Dixon
July 1, 2015

It looks like Alexis Tsipras is crumbling.

After the banks closed and public opinion started moving against him, the Greek prime minister seems desperate for a deal with his creditors. Athens has now defaulted to the International Monetary Fund, adding to the pressure. But it is not clear lenders will cut him any slack. They may prefer to deal with his successor.

Mental accounting – the jar fallacy

By Guest Contributor
April 15, 2014

–Ian Bright is Senior Economist at ING. The opinions expressed are his own.–

When Dustin Hoffman was first starting out as an actor, struggling to make ends meet, he managed his money in a simple – but potentially financially dangerous – way.

from The Great Debate:

Britain’s austerity experiment is faltering

By Nicholas Wapshott
March 28, 2012

It was the Welsh sage Alan Watkins who remarked that a budget that looked good the day it was delivered to the British Parliament was sure to look terrible a week later, and vice versa. The avalanche of new information dumped by the Treasury is simply too much to grasp at a single sitting, and governments tend to bury bad news in a welter of statistics. And so it proved with finance minister George Osborne’s budget served up last week.

from The Great Debate:

How the Industrial Revolution created modern debt

By Philip Coggan
February 7, 2012

This is an excerpt from Paper Promises: Debt, Money and the New World Order, published this week by PublicAffairs.

Capitalism and democracy under threat from euro zone crisis

November 3, 2011

By Laurence Copeland. The author is a professor of finance at Cardiff University Business School. The opinions expressed are his own.

Is there such a thing as a real safe haven?

August 5, 2011

By Kathleen Brooks. The opinions expressed are her own.

There are traditional relationships that the financial markets respect. For example, when the markets are tanking the world wants to own safe havens like the yen, the Swiss franc, U.S. debt and gold. If volatility spikes investors go into auto-mode and are almost pre-programmed to purchase these asset classes.