The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

NSA as ‘Big Brother’? Not even close

By Nina Khrushcheva
June 28, 2013

Reader holding a copy of George Orwell's 1984, June 9, 2013.  REUTERS/Toby Melville

from Jack Shafer:

Snowden versus the dragons

By Jack Shafer
June 18, 2013

One measure of our culture's disdain for whistle-blowers like Edward Snowden can be culled from the pages of a thesaurus. Beyond "source" and "leaker," few neutral antonyms exist to describe people who divulge alleged wrongdoing by the government or other organizations to the press, while negative synonyms abound—spy, double-agent, rat, snitch, informer, fink, double-crosser, canary, stoolie, squealer, turncoat, betrayer, traitor and so on.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Buying into Big Brother

By Nicholas Wapshott
June 12, 2013

Whatever high crimes and misdemeanors the National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden may or may not have perpetrated, he has at least in one regard done us all a favor. He has reminded us that we are all victims of unwarranted and inexcusable invasions of privacy by companies who collect our data as they do business with us.

from Jack Shafer:

Edward Snowden and the selective targeting of leaks

By Jack Shafer
June 11, 2013

Edward Snowden's expansive disclosures to the Guardian and the Washington Post about various National Security Agency (NSA) surveillance programs have only two corollaries in contemporary history—the classified cache Bradley Manning allegedly released to WikiLeaks a few years ago and Daniel Ellsberg's dissemination of the voluminous Pentagon Papers to the New York Times and other newspapers in 1971.