The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

Why Egypt’s crackdown on Islamists will lead to bloodshed

By Mohamad Bazzi
July 1, 2015

A woman burns a portrait of ousted President Mohamed Mursi at the funeral of Egyptian public prosecutor Hisham Barakat, on the second anniversary of the June 30 protests, in Cairo

A woman burns a portrait of ousted President Mohamed Mursi at the funeral of Egyptian public prosecutor Hisham Barakat, on the second anniversary of the June 30 protests, in Cairo, Egypt, June 30, 2015. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany

from The Great Debate:

Arab nations just created a joint military force. Why now?

By Shibley Telhami
April 2, 2015

Saudi special forces snipers demonstrate their shooting skills before their graduation ceremony near Riyadh

Saudi special forces snipers demonstrate their shooting skills before their graduation ceremony near Riyadh, March 22, 2011. REUTERS/Fahad Shadeed ​

from The Great Debate:

Egypt’s grand mufti: No justification for terror in any religion

By Shawky Allam
April 1, 2015

A view of the Mosque of Mohammed Ali in the Citadel, the Sultan Hasan Mosque and the Al-Rifa'i Mosque in Cairo

The Mosque of Mohammed Ali in the Citadel (top), the Sultan Hasan Mosque and the Al-Rifa'i Mosque (bottom right) in Cairo, May 20, 2008, REUTERS/Nasser Nuri

from John Lloyd:

U.S. ‘soft power’ hits another hard reality in the Middle East

By John Lloyd
November 12, 2014

Relatives of detained activists cry and pray for them as the activists stand trial at a court in Cairo

On Sunday, June 22, 1941, Winston Churchill’s private secretary, John Colville, woke him with the news that Nazi Germany had invaded the Soviet Union. In a radio address that same evening, the British prime minister repeated his “consistent” opposition to communism, but said that “all this flashes away … the Russian danger is therefore our danger.” In a later House of Commons debate, Churchill quipped -- “If Hitler invaded Hell, I would at least make a favorable reference to the devil in the House of Commons.”

from The Great Debate:

The war in Gaza threatens Egypt too

By Shibley Telhami
July 22, 2014

A Palestinian woman wearing clothes stained with the blood of other relatives, who medics said were wounded in Israeli shelling, cries at a hospital in Gaza City

Cairo’s efforts to mediate between Israel and the Palestinians in Gaza, according to conventional wisdom, have largely been dictated by President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi’s animosity toward Hamas. After all, Hamas is an offshoot of the Muslim Brotherhood, which Sisi’s government has declared a terrorist organization and regards as a serious threat.

from The Great Debate:

The other Egyptian crisis

By Shirin Neshat
March 5, 2014

Like most artists, I often wonder what art’s place is in a world that seems consumed by violence during these times of social upheaval.

Egypt’s treatment of women is a social nuclear weapon

November 15, 2013

There was widespread dismay at a recent survey that ranked Egypt as the worst Arab country to be a woman. The poll, conducted by the Thomson Reuters Foundation, found that an astonishingly high 99% of women and girls experience sexual harassment, and worst of all the perpetrators of this abuse often go unpunished. Egypt scored poorly in every category of the poll including violence against women, reproductive rights and their inclusion in politics and the economy.

from The Great Debate:

The surprising force behind change in Cairo

By Iman Bibars
July 31, 2013

In the space of two years, ordinary Egyptian citizens have organized and led two revolutions that caused two distinct dictatorial regimes to fall. These were street-led revolutions against autocratic regimes that had the support of the U.S. and were thus seen to be invincible.

from The Great Debate:

Historically, Egypt’s revolution is more of the same

By Jonathan Adelman
July 8, 2013

The history of revolutions tells us one sad fact: Egypt is in for a long period of violence, chaos and upheaval before it even begins to enter into the Promised Land of democracy.

from The Great Debate:

Egypt: Elections do not make a democracy

By Bill Schneider
July 8, 2013

An election is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for democracy.  That's the takeaway from the continuing upheaval in Egypt.