The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

What just happened in Egypt?

By Shibley Telhami
July 4, 2013

It was not supposed to turn out this way: Only a year after Egyptians freely elected Mohamed Mursi as their president for a four-year term, he was removed by a military decree. This sets in motion a “road map” for a new transitional period leading to another experiment akin to the period following the fall of President Hosni Mubarak in 2011.

from The Great Debate:

The key to understanding the ‘Arab Spring’

By Graeme Bannerman
October 11, 2012

The United States has been unable to develop a clear national policy about the Arab Spring largely because Washington does not fully understand what’s happening in the Middle East.

from The Great Debate:

One year later: three lessons from the Arab Spring

By Stefan Wolff
November 25, 2011

By Stefan Wolff
The opinions expressed are his own.

When Mohamed Bouazizi, a jobless graduate in the provincial city of Sidi Bouzid in Tunisia, about 200km southwest of the capital Tunis, set himself on fire on December 18, 2010 after police had confiscated a cart from which he was selling fruit and vegetables, few would have predicted that this event would spark the phenomenon we now refer to as the Arab Spring. Protests quickly escalated in Tunisia and within four weeks Tunisian President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali had to flee to Saudi Arabia having failed to stop the protests either by repression of promises of reform.

from David Rohde:

Complete Egypt’s revolution

By David Rohde
November 23, 2011

For decades, the Egyptian military has operated an economy within an economy in Egypt. With the tacit support of the United States, the armed forces own and operate a sprawling network of for-profit businesses. The military runs factories that manufacture televisions, bottled water and other consumer goods. Its companies obtain public land at discounted prices. And it pays no taxes and discloses little to civilian officials.

from FaithWorld:

Vague agenda fuels doubts over real aims of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood

June 26, 2011

(The Sphinx at the great pyramids on the outskirts of Cairo, February 25, 2011/Amr Abdallah Dalsh)

from FaithWorld:

Will the Arab Spring bring U.S.-style “culture wars” to the Middle East?

June 21, 2011

(From left: Olivier Roy, Cardinal Angelo Scola and Martino Diez of the Oasis Foundation at the conference on San Servolo island, Venice, June 20, 2011/Giorgia Dalle Ore/Oasis)

from Business Traveller:

Ancient wonders, all to yourself

May 11, 2011

Tourism at Egypt’s Red Sea resorts, we read, has plummeted. At the Giza Pyramids, not one Western tourist could be seen by a Reuters correspondent as the sun set on an April weekday. Surely this makes it the perfect time to visit?

from FaithWorld:

Sectarian strife tests Egypt’s post-Mubarak rulers

May 10, 2011

(A soldier stands guard near the Saint Mary church which was set on fire during clashes between Muslims and Christians on Saturday in the heavily populated area of Imbaba in Cairo May 8, 2011/Asmaa Waguih)

from The Great Debate:

Why democracy will win

By Philip N. Howard
March 25, 2011


Philip N. Howard, an associate professor at the University of Washington, is the author of "The Digital Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy:  Information Technology and Political Islam". The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

Egypt needs a reconstruction fund too

By Hugo Dixon
March 24, 2011

By Hugo Dixon
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.