The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

Europe’s greatest crisis isn’t Greece or Ukraine, and it may have no solution

By John Lloyd
April 22, 2015

Boys chat as they arrive with migrants at the Sicilian harbor of Augusta

Boys chat as they arrive at the Sicilian harbor of Augusta April 22, 2015. REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi

from Breakingviews:

EU migration policy is economically short-sighted

By Edward Hadas
April 20, 2015

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Hugo Dixon:

Tories and Labour are almost twins

By Hugo Dixon
April 20, 2015

Are the Tories and Labour the Tweedledum and Tweedledee of UK politics? In most things, there’s not much to choose between the UK parties’ economic election pledges. Both want to cut the deficit gradually. Both want to splash out on the National Health Service. And both have a smattering of silly micro-policies. The big differences are that Labour would tax the rich more and the Tories might take Britain out of the European Union.

from Breakingviews:

Ukraine crisis forced into suspended animation for 2015

December 29, 2014

By Pierre Briançon

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate:

No drama in Obama’s Ukraine policy

April 22, 2014

Many are asking: How can we stop Russian President Vladimir Putin from moving into Ukraine and seizing a large chunk of its territory in the east? The actions of forces that resemble the Russian special operations troops who created the conditions for annexation of Crimea suggest that other parts of Ukraine may also be in the Russian strongman's sights.

from Ian Bremmer:

The G7 and the limits of Russia’s ‘political isolation’

By Ian Bremmer
March 28, 2014

 

On Wednesday, President Barack Obama delivered the major address of his weeklong trip to Europe, focusing on the Russian incursions into Ukraine and the coordinated Western retaliation. “Together, we have isolated Russia politically, suspending it from the G8 nations,” Obama said. For annexing Crimea, Russia was punished with temporary exile from this coalition of advanced industrial democracies, a group of Western countries that collectively act on their shared values.

US-China research ties should be a wake-up call to Europe

By Guest Contributor
June 7, 2013

–Dirk Jan van den Berg is President of Delft University of Technology, and was formerly the Dutch Ambassador to China and the Permanent Representative to the United Nations in New York. The opinions expressed are his own.–

from The Great Debate:

The year ahead in the euro zone: Lower risks, same problems

By Nouriel Roubini
January 14, 2013

Financial conditions in the euro zone have significantly improved since the summer, when euro zone risks peaked because of German policymakers’ open consideration of a Greek exit, and the sovereign spreads of Italy and Spain reached new heights. The day before European Central Bank President Mario Draghi’s famous speech in London in which he announced that the ECB would do “whatever it takes” to save the euro, bond yields in Spain and Italy were at 7.75 percent and 6.75 percent, respectively, and rising. When the ECB announced its outright monetary transactions (OMT) bond-buying program, the euro zone was at risk of a collapse.

Imagining an election in the United States of Europe

November 16, 2012

By Kathleen Brooks. The opinions expressed are her own.

The aftermath of the U.S. presidential election has seen some tentative steps towards political harmony. After a bruising campaign with Democrats and Republicans at each others throats for most of the last two years, President Obama declared in his victory speech that there is no such thing as blue or red states, there is only the United States of America.

from Hugo Dixon:

Brexit could come before Grexit

By Hugo Dixon
November 12, 2012

Investors have been obsessed with the notion of “Grexit” - Greece’s exit from the euro. But “Brexit” - Britain’s exit from the European Union - is as likely if not more so. The country has never been at ease with its EU membership. It refused to join its predecessor, the European Economic Community, in 1957; it was then blocked twice from becoming a member by France’s Charles De Gaulle in 1960s; and shortly after it finally entered in 1973, it had a referendum on whether to stay.