The Great Debate UK

from Hugo Dixon:

How a Greek debt deal could work

June 15, 2015

greek.jpg

REUTERS

Athens has struggled to get its euro zone creditors to talk about debt relief. That is because it is not the most urgent issue facing Greece. A short-term cash crunch could trigger bankruptcy in the next few weeks. But if the negotiators resolve the immediate crisis – and the omens don’t look good - debt relief should come onto the table.

from Hugo Dixon:

Greece needs a second election

May 25, 2015

Greece_Tsipras.jpg

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

from The Great Debate:

Why Poland’s presidential election may shake up the European Union

May 22, 2015

Polish President Komorowski and his wife Anna speak to media after casting votes in presidential election at polling station in Warsaw

Polish President Bronislaw Komorowski and his wife Anna speak to the media after voting in the first round of the presidential election at a polling station in Warsaw, Poland, May 10, 2015. REUTERS/Slawomir Kaminski / Agencja Gazeta

from The Great Debate:

Iron curtains: The world’s new dividing lines are no better than the old

May 14, 2015

Bulgarian border police stand near a barbed wire fence on the Bulgarian-Turkish border

Bulgarian border police stand near a barbed wire fence on the Bulgarian-Turkish border July 17, 2014. REUTERS/Stoyan Nenov

from Hugo Dixon:

Tory win in UK election brings increased risk of EU exit

May 8, 2015

The results of exit polls are projected on to the side of Broadcasting House in central London

The results of exit polls are projected on to the side of Broadcasting House, the headquarters of the BBC, after voting closed in Britain's general election, in central London, May 8, 2015. REUTERS/Eddie Keogh

from The Great Debate:

Ed Miliband’s Obama-inspired rhetoric didn’t play in the UK

May 8, 2015

Britain's opposition Labour Party leader Ed Miliband announces his resignation as leader at a news conference in London

Britain's opposition Labour Party leader Ed Miliband announces his resignation as leader at a news conference in London, Britain May 8, 2015. REUTERS/Neil Hall

from The Great Debate:

Russia building nuclear reactors – and influence – around the globe

April 29, 2015

Russia's President Putin, his Egyptian counterpart Sisi and Russia's Defence Minister Shoigu attend a welcoming ceremony onboard guided missile cruiser Moskva at Sochi

Russian President Vladimir Putin (2nd L), his Egyptian counterpart Abdel Fattah al-Sisi (2nd R) and Russia’s Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu (L) meet onboard a guided missile cruiser at the port of Sochi, August 12, 2014. REUTERS/Alexei Druzhinin/RIA Novosti/Kremlin

from The Great Debate:

Strong or weak, bully or buffoon? Will the real Russia please stand up?

December 17, 2014

Russia's President Putin speaks during a commemoration of the Hermitage's 250th anniversary at the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg

The West has been unable to develop a coherent strategic policy toward Russia. There is little agreement on what Russia is and how to deal with it, too much speculation about what President Vladimir Putin will or will not do.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Why Britain’s days as a haven of political, economic stability are numbered

November 21, 2014

Flares are let off as police stand guard while pro-union protestors clash with pro-independence protestors during a demonstration at George Square in Glasgow

For the past five years, Britain has been a haven of political and economic stability amid the turbulence in Europe. No longer.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Time for a ‘melt-up': the coming global boom

November 14, 2014

European Central Bank Governor Mario Draghi speaks at a news conference during the World Bank/IMF annual meetings in Washington

Get ready for a “melt-up.”

Back in mid-October, as stock markets around the world plunged faster than at any time since 2011, many investors and economists feared a meltdown. But with the U.S. economy steadily expanding, monetary and fiscal policies becoming more stimulative in other parts of the world and the autumn season for financial crises now over, a melt-up seems far more likely.