The Great Debate UK

from MacroScope:

Bernanke Who?

December 9, 2009

When it comes to investing in a turbulent market, is ignorance bliss? According to a new survey by IBM, around half of U.S. investors have never heard of Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke. This, despite the fact that 67 percent say the global financial crisis has prompted them to pay greater attention to financial news. More than one-third could not identify the current unemployment rate. In case you missed it, the jobless rate eased to 10 percent in November after hitting a 26-1/2-year high of 10.2 percent in October.

When firms “Too Big to Fail” fall

November 5, 2009

Amid the turmoil of the 2008 financial crisis a myriad of events unfolded that the general public knew nothing about, writes New York Times reporter Andrew Ross Sorkin in a new book titled “Too Big to Fail.”

Narrow banking: reforms for the future

November 3, 2009

British economist and author John Kay argues in “Narrow Banking: the reform of banking legislation” that the financial services industry should be restructured to ensure that regulation serves the interests of the public.

from The Great Debate:

Time for a shareholder revolt

By J Saft
October 27, 2009

jamessaft1(James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own)

There are encouraging signs that shareholders are becoming more assertive in defending their interests.

Glossy or matte? Women in the recession

October 21, 2009

Glenda Stone- Glenda Stone is chief executive and founder of Aurora, a recruitment advertising and market intelligence company, and co-chairs the UK Women’s Enterprise Taskforce established by Prime Minister Gordon Brown. The opinions expressed are her own.-

from UK News:

Roger Bootle throws capitalism a life preserver

September 30, 2009

Problems sparked by the financial crisis have not gone away, but have been transferred to the public sector, economist Roger Bootle posits in his new book.In "The Trouble With Markets: Saving Capitalism from Itself" Bootle argues that in large measure, the underlying cause of the financial crisis was the result of an idea that markets work, and that governments do not."Despite the trillions of dollars lost, and despite the worries of millions of people, more than this -- much, much more -- is at stake," Bootle writes. "For this crisis has delivered the killer blow to an idea that has underpinned the structure of society, framed the political debate, and moulded international relations for decades."Bootle, director of Capital Economics and an economic advisor to business accountancy firm Deloitte, reflects on the pitfalls of the corporate system and puts forth his ideas on the future of capitalism.He discussed his book and his economic predictions with Reuters at his London office.

Economic outlook remains fragile

September 26, 2009

John Monks-John Monks is general secretary at the European Trade Union Confederation. The opinions expressed are his own.-

from Commentaries:

“Tobin tax” gaining ground in Europe

By Paul Taylor
September 21, 2009

No longer just a hopeless cause for anti-capitalist activists, the idea of a global tax on financial transactions is gaining ground in Europe.

How significant was the Lehman collapse to the UK economy?

September 15, 2009

geoffrey-wood- Geoffrey Wood is professor of economics at Cass Business School in London. The opinions expressed are his own -

from Commentaries:

Stones and glass houses, offshore tax haven edition

September 4, 2009

One of the week's more amusing stories takes us to the sun-kissed shores of the Cayman Islands, scuba diver's paradise, magnet for hedge funds and - until very recently - world-beating tax haven.