The Great Debate UK

from MacroScope:

Banking on a Portuguese bailout?

portgualprotest.jpgReuters polls of economists over the last few weeks have come up with some pretty firm conclusions about both Ireland and Portugal needing a bailout from the European Union.

Portuguese 10-year government bond yields have hovered stubbornly above 7 percent since the Irish bailout announcement, hitting a euro-lifetime high and giving ammunition to those who say Lisbon will be forced into a bailout.

And of those who hold that view, it’s clear that bank economists have been most vocal in expecting Ireland and Portugal to seek outside help.

Take last week’s poll in which economists said Portugal would follow Ireland in applying for EU funds. Bank-based economists who expected a Portuguese bailout outnumbered those who didn’t almost three-to-one. For non-bank economists – those working at research houses, brokers and wealth management firms – the margin was only two-to-one.

from Global Investing:

Solar activities and market cycles

Can nature's cycles enrich our finance and market theories?

Market predictions based on the alignment of the sun, moon and the earth and other cycles could help investors stay disciplined and profit in economic storms, says Daniel Shaffer, CEO of Shaffer Asset Management.

SPACE/SUN

Shaffer writes that sunspot activities show that the sun has an approximate 11-year cycle and as of March 31, 2009, sunspot activity has reached a 100-year low (this, interestingly, coincides with a cycle low in equity markets, reached sometime mid-March in 2009).

from Breakingviews:

Geithner presents timely challenge for EU banks

Michel Barnier wants Europe to be better prepared for the next financial crisis. But the EU's financial market chief's plan for bank taxes seems to miss the point. Timothy Geithner's push for EU-wide stress tests raises questions of its own. But at least the U.S. Treasury Secretary has identified the core problem facing Europe's financial sector.

The current euro zone crisis has its roots in sovereign debt. But concerns about banks' exposure to risky sovereign debt have led to strain in the European inter-bank funding markets. There are also signs that U.S. money-market funds, which hold more than $500 billion of euro zone financial assets, are drawing back.

Signs are positive for markets and economy

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SCHWAB.IMG_4329-Kully Samra is UK Branch Director at Charles Schwab. The opinions expressed are his own.-

There is no doubt that since the lows in March 2009 the U.S. market has rallied massively. However, at Charles Schwab we believe that whilst economic progress will continue, we must look to the months ahead with some caution.  We remain optimistic regarding the equity markets in the longer term and the economy in the short term, but recognise that increased volatility will likely characterise 2010.

from MacroScope:

The end of capitalism

Hard to imagine with financial markets still buoyant and newspapers full of tales of bonus greed, but there is still the possibility that captialism will end.  At least there is according to prestigious investment consultants Watson Wyatt in their latest study called "Extreme Risks".

The firm listed the demise of the system of private ownership as one of 15 threats to investors and the global economy that probably won't happen but which it reckons are worth worrying about anyway. The idea behind the report is that such things as climate change, the break up of the euro zone and war are always worth being included in an investment risk management process.

Is a bubble burbling in financial markets?

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JaneFoley.JPG-Jane Foley is research director at Forex.com. The opinions expressed are her own.-

The discrediting of the efficient markets theory in the aftermath of the financial crisis appears to have been accompanied with growing support for the view that rather than efficient in nature, financial markets are predisposed towards the formation of bubbles.

The causes of the crash

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philip-boothhighres3- Philip Booth is editorial and programme director at the Institute of Economic Affairs. He is editor of “Verdict on the Crash,” a new book available from the IEA. His opinions are his own. -

In “Verdict on the Crash” we argue that government failure and not market failure is responsible for the collapse in financial markets.

from The Great Debate:

Get ready for the “Great Immoderation”

James Saft Great Debate -- James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

The recession will soon be dead, laid to rest alongside the idea of the "Great Moderation", a set of hopeful assumptions that underpins expectations about economic growth and asset valuations.

This, when investors, bankers and executives ultimately realise it will cause them to pull in their horns, take less risks and be less willing to pay high prices for assets.

from The Great Debate:

The recovery will feel familiar: lousy

James Saft Great Debate -- James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

The good news that the United States cannot keep contracting the way it has been is not to be confused with a return to robust expansion, a point financial markets eventually will grasp.

Consumers, the mainspring of the U.S. economy, will see the cash from government stimulus slip through their fingers but will still face very ugly personal balance sheets and a brutal job market. Their party is not going to get started again for some time.

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