The Great Debate UK

from Felix Salmon:

Will the world ever have open borders?

My favorite bit in this video comes towards the end, when I ask Charles about the wonderful tweet he sent out last Friday, after the gay marriage bill passed the New York senate.

One day we'll see legal discrimination by *place* of birth as evil as discrim. by other features of birth --gender, orientation, color.less than a minute ago via web Favorite Retweet ReplyCharles Kenny
charlesjkenny

I wanted to know, was this just a lovely sentiment, or does Charles really think this is going to happen? The answer is the latter, and Charles gives two strong reasons why that might be the case.

One is the way that the world is getting smaller and more interconnected. Countries make hundreds of agreements with each other, they set up organizations like the UN and the EU, and in general behave much more pleasantly towards each other than they ever have in the past. And at some level that has to be because doing so is what their people want.

Charles's second point was about mobility and immigration, and it's a great one. Greater levels of immigration aren't just a fantastic idea from a national-security standpoint and a fiscal standpoint, they're also demographically necessary for an aging America which has a lot of labor-intensive needs in a service sector which can't be outsourced. "The self-interest of people will weaken the effects of borders," says Kenny, which is surely true. Americans don't like immigration, but they love the low prices that immigration brings for their golf courses and swimming pools and McMansions.

from FaithWorld:

The slow death of multiculturalism in Europe

The following is a guest contribution. Reuters is not responsible for the content and the views expressed are the authors’ alone. Ibrahim Kalin is senior advisor to Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan. This article first appeared in Today's Zaman in Istanbul and is reprinted with its permission.

multiculti europeBy Ibrahim Kalin

Has multiculturalism run its course in Europe? If one takes a picture of certain European countries today and freezes it, that would be the logical conclusion.

from FaithWorld:

“Burqa bans”: First France, then the Netherlands – who’s next?

veil 1First the French banned Muslim face veils, now the Dutch have decided to follow suit. With debates about outlawing burqas and niqabs spreading across Europe, a third ban -- perhaps even more -- may not be far behind. (Photo: A Muslim woman protests against France's banning of full face veils outside the French Embassy in London September 25, 2010/Luke MacGregor)

Only a small minority of Muslim women in Europe cover their faces, but their veils have become ominous symbols for Europeans troubled by problems such as the economic crisis, immigration and Muslim integration.

Confronting the immigration conundrum

Photo

BRITAIN-IMMIGRATION/

-Laurence Copeland is a professor of finance at Cardiff Business School. The opinions expressed are his own.-

After being the third rail of British politics for a generation or more, immigration is suddenly a topic which can be spoken about in polite society.

  •