The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

Real commodity prices and the U.S. rate cycle

February 10, 2010

-- John Kemp is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own. --

Commodity prices exhibit a strong cyclical component -- though it can be masked when producers are carrying a lot of excess capacity.

Little chance of a rate hike until at least Q3

January 23, 2010

cr_mega_503_JaneFoley.JPG-Jane Foley is research director at Forex.com. The opinions expressed are her own. -

You never know when rates will rise

October 8, 2009

David Kuo-David Kuo, Director at the financial website The Motley Fool. The opinions expressed are his own.-

from Commentaries:

Bernanke: Back to Clark Kent

August 11, 2009

Having averted a disaster, cartoon superheroes typically revert to their bland civilian identities. With the recession loosening its grip, Ben Bernanke is trying a similar trick.

from The Great Debate:

BoE extends QE, fears 1930s re-run

August 6, 2009

John Kemp

-- John Kemp is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own --

The Bank of England's decision to continue with its asset purchase programme, or quantitative easing (QE), at the rate of 50 billion pounds per quarter in Oct-Dec, unchanged from Jul-Sep, shows bank officials are more worried about ending support for the recovery too soon than about risking inflation by leaving it too late.

Savers must start becoming investors

May 8, 2009

david-kuo_motley-foolthumbnail- David Kuo is director at The Motley Fool. The opinions expressed are his own. -

Pensioners feel pinch from low rates

May 8, 2009

rtrt8h- Sharon Bratley is chartered financial planner at Fair Investment. The opinions expressed are her own. -

Bank of England faces dilemma on QE extension

April 9, 2009

johnkemp– John Kemp is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own –

Quantitative easing a last resort

April 9, 2009

img_3391-alan-clarke-Alan Clarke is UK economist at BNP Paribas. The opinions expressed are his own-

As expected, the Bank of England left the Bank Rate unchanged at 0.5 percent at the April meeting, the first unchanged decision since September 2008.