The Great Debate UK

Women leaders: High peaks, low gullies

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glenda_stone- Glenda Stone is an Australian businesswomen in the UK, CEO of Aurora and a commentator on economic gender issues. The opinions expressed are her own. Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.–.-

In Australia there is a common expression of social phenomenon called the “Tall Poppy Syndrome”. It is a pejorative term that describes human behaviour of attacking, despising or attempting to cut down or criticise people of genuine merit because their achievements or talent distinguish them above their peers. Targets are often accomplished people with a public profile: business leaders, politicians, academics – and at times even celebrities and sporting personalities.

The media can be especially vicious in strategising, fuelling and orchestrating smear campaigns with the sole intention of defaming and questioning the character and ability of high-profile leaders.

So three questions arise: Do different countries differ in their appetite and media tolerance for Tall Poppy Syndrome? Has inaccurate, sensationalist, instant reporting in the media become a globally accepted normative standard? And are women even greater targets for negative media attention because of unfair, deeply ingrained societal gender bias?

Does International Women’s Day hold any relevance?

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Chris Parke -Chris Parke is managing director at Talking Talent. The opinions expressed are his own. Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.-

As we celebrate International Women’s Day’s 99th anniversary, we should also be asking ourselves – does it hold any relevance anymore? I would argue that it does. Although gender equality has progressed in leaps and bounds over the decades, there are still plenty of global issues to tackle. Have we really found the holy grail of complete gender equality? Certainly not, and, although there is much to be said for the progress we have made, there are noticeable ‘cracks’ appearing. And the harder people look, the bigger they seem to get.

Pop culture and media messages keep women down

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mavin- Professor Sharon Mavin is Associate Dean (Research) at Newcastle Business School, Northumbria University. The opinions expressed are her own. Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.--

International Women’s Day remains an important reminder of disadvantaged women globally, as well as a marker of women’s progress in society. IWD is an opportunity to reflect on changes still to come and the need for continued activism in representing the interests of women around the world.

Time to break the silence on injustices against women

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gisellportenier- Giselle Portenier is an  award-winning documentary filmmaker who focuses on human rights abuses around the world and a member of the Toronto Human Rights Watch Film Festival committee. The opinions expressed are her own. Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.-

Soon it will be that famous Ladies’ Day again, International Women’s Day, when the Western press packs their pages with stories—and it’s already started– either celebrating all we have achieved, or lamenting all that still eludes us—equal pay for work of equal value, glass ceilings, balancing work and family life, domestic violence, and so on.

Second time lucky for Biocon’s Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw

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kiranSetting up Biocon, Asia’s largest biotechnology firm, was not a straightforward task for the woman who is now India’s wealthiest businesswoman.

Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw chose the biotechnology sector as a fallback position after she realised at the age of 25 that India was not ready to accept a woman master brewer.

Aiming for leadership equality in the UK

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MargiGordon- Margi Gordon is director of tailored programmes at Roffey Park Institute – a provider of Leadership and Management courses. The opinions expressed are her own. Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.-

It’s been 40 years since the Equal Pay Act and yet there is still a gender reward gap.  We know that professional women in the UK start their careers on equal pay with men and continue to do well until they take a career break to have children. They then face the difficult choice of prioritising their career or their family.

All merit is equal – but some merit is more equal

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Savita_Kumra- Dr. Savita Kumra is a senior lecturer at Brunel Business School. The opinions expressed are her own. Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.-

As we approach International Women’s Day, the usual excitement is in the air. A time when the contributions, progress and outstanding impact that women make to everyday society is celebrated is surely a time for some pride amongst us as women, but perhaps also a pause for some reflection.

Women doctors must push for leadership roles

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Shelley Ross

- Dr. Shelley Ross is Secretary-General of the Medical Women’s International Association, a non-governmental organisation representing women doctors from all continents. The opinions expressed are her own. Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.-

The theme that the United Nations has chosen for the 2010 International Women’s Day is “Equal Rights, Equal Opportunities:  Progress for All.”  What does this mean to women in medicine?

Battle for key professional roles ongoing for women

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AngelaEagle

-Angela Eagle is Minister of State for Pensions and Ageing Society. The opinions expressed are her own. Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.-

International Women’s Day is still as relevant today as it was almost a century ago when it was first established. In Britain, when the suffragettes won the right to vote on equal terms with men in 1928, there was a feeling that there would be an inevitable journey towards full equality with men. But we now know that there are other battles that still need to be won.

The meeting of young minds

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IMG01410-20100209-1350A sedate group of more than 1,000 young people brought together in London to discuss socio-political issues makes a sharp contrast to those who challenge the status quo via demonstrations, rallies and picket lines.

At the first annual One Young World, organised by advertising agency Euro RSCG Worldwide, delegates 25 years of age and younger network in an environment sanctioned by such high-profile “counsellors” as former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, economist Muhammad Yunus and musician Bob Geldof.

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