The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

Apple: ‘Early adopter’ as fashionista

To much fanfare, Apple announced Tuesday that Angela Ahrendts is resigning as chief executive officer of Burberry and joining the inner circle in Cupertino, California. “Apple-polishing” has become the headline du jour. Picturing the soignée Ahrendts surrounded by geeks in jeans and hoodies, we might be forgiven for wondering why Apple feels in need of a fashionista buff-up. After all, there is hardly a product line more shiny-bright than Apple’s -- or one with less affinity to the cold exclusivity of the world’s great fashion houses.

But the extraordinary affection that iPhones inspire is different from the anxious ostentation surrounding high fashion.

However sublime couture may be, it is neither lovable nor practical. Nor does using it feel like participating in a major human advance. There is something wondrous about Apple products in the ease and pleasure they afford their users, connecting us in unprecedented ways to other people, to our surroundings and to the world of ideas.

In contrast to beautiful, yet exclusive and often unaffordable fashion products, “Apple was the first company that took high design and made it mainstream,” Phil Libin, Evernote’s chief executive officer, explained. “It taught the world taste.”

from MediaFile:

Apple and Twitter: A New Power Duo?

One big winner coming out of Apple’s developers’ conference on Monday is Twitter.

Apple announced that the Internet microblogging service will be integrated directly into future versions of the iPhone and iPad software.

from Business Traveller:

Travelling through the cloud on a tablet

John McHugh, VP and Chief Marketing Officer, Brocade

As technology and business travel become ever more inextricably connected, I talk to a man whose life is a symbiosis of both worlds

John McHugh, VP and Chief Marketing Officer of networking infrastructure firm Brocade, proudly sits on both sides of the buyer-seller fence. On one hand, a WiFi-less or WiFi-jammed hotel will not be seeing his custom again in a hurry; on the other, his company offers hotels WiFi deployment.

from MediaFile:

Will Blackberry “Torch” catch fire?

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The makers of the Blackberry, Research In Motion, unveiled a new version of the smartphone with a touchscreen and slideout keyboard, which is aimed squarely at the iPhone. It runs on AT&T's network and is called "Torch" --but will it catch fire in world of popular consumer gadgets?

The event occurred as attendees and analysts also wondered how Research in Motion would respond to questions about the security of its messaging system.

“Stuff” deconstructs the year in gadgets

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-Fraser Macdonald is the editor of Stuff. The opinions expressed are his own.-

Deciding on the Cool List turns the Stuff office into a maelstrom. Our Gadget Awards, held later in the year, involves a straightforward categorised decision process.

Phone of the Year, for example, is one of the phones launched in the past year that meets all of the awards criteria. Easy.

Growth of mobile commerce taps touch Web users

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Picture shows Steve Ives, CEO of Taptu. REUTERS/Julie Mollins

As the mobile phone industry puts more emphasis on marketing hand-held smartphones, consumers are finding ways to dodge restrictive model-compatible applications by using Web-based programs.

Unlike single-device applications, mobile touch websites run on most mobile browsers freeing users from reliance on a specific operating system.

Apple tablet an iPhone on steroids?

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Simon Osborne Walker- Simon Osborne-Walker is Stuff.tv editor. The opinions expressed are his own. -

On Wednesday, Apple will change the face of computing in the same way that it put an iPhone-shaped bomb under the mobile industry.

Rumour has it that we’re going to see a tablet computer that builds on the touchscreen iPhone interface that redefined what we expect from today’s technology. An iPhone on steroids, with a 10-inch touchscreen to offer the best compromise between portability and media browsing.

Are mobile networks at risk of a meltdown?

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social networking- Steve Nicholson, CEO at The Cloud. -

Five years ago the thought that we could be on the move accessing applications such as You Tube or Facebook, or watching TV or listening to music using our mobile phones was no more than a dream – today it’s a reality.

If we take a step back and assess the journey of the mobile phone over the past few years it has been nothing short of epic.  It has progressed from a piece of technology for the modern business person to a must-have item.

from Breakingviews:

Apple’s iSlate overflows with expectations

What’s the iSlate worth? It’s not an easy question to answer, as Apple isn’t even confirming it’s got a tablet computer gadget in the works. But the market gives a rough guide to what Wall Street expects from the new device. Investors seem to be slapping an “iSlate premium” of some $25 billion on Apple’s value. Though Apple boss Steve Jobs’ skill at launching new products is unparalleled, meeting these hopes will be a tall order.

Since July, Apple’s market cap has jumped by $64 billion to $193 billion. The bulls have been stampeding over that time, but the tech company’s performance has been more than double that of the broader market. On that basis, Apple has added some $35 billion more value than it would have if it had paced the market.

from The Great Debate:

The Android opportunity

gruber.jpg-- John Gruber writes and publishes Daring Fireball, a web site for Mac, web and design enthusiasts. He lives in Philadelphia with his wife and five-year-old son. This article first appeared on Daring Fireball. The views expressed are his own. --

In just the past few weeks Steven Frank, Alex Payne, and Andre Torrez all tried switching from the iPhone to Android. All three are smart, open-minded, and eloquent regarding their reasons for trying Android. All three are developers who care about the quality and design of software and hardware.

All three found Android significantly lacking.

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The new G1 phone running Google's Android software. REUTERS/Jacob Silberberg

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