The Great Debate UK

from MacroScope:

Banking on a Portuguese bailout?

November 30, 2010

portgualprotest.jpgReuters polls of economists over the last few weeks have come up with some pretty firm conclusions about both Ireland and Portugal needing a bailout from the European Union.

from Breakingviews:

Irish bank restructuring has tidy if slow solution

November 24, 2010

Ireland's bloated banking sector needs fewer, smaller lenders. A sovereign bailout should provide breathing space to perform a radical restructuring. But a fire sale of Irish banking assets is not the only way to cut the banks down to size.

from MacroScope:

Europe’s over-achievers and their fall from grace

November 24, 2010

Ireland's fall from grace has been rapid and far worse than that of its counterparts, even Greece. But life in the euro zone has still been one of profound growth, as it has for most of the other peripheral economies.

from Felix Salmon:

Is Ireland’s problem a Basel problem?

By Felix Salmon
November 24, 2010

Does the Ireland crisis bespeak a major weakness in the Basel capital-adequacy regime? Simon Nixon thinks so: the fact that investors won't lend to Bank of Ireland, he says, "highlights a major weakness of the Basel capital rules that European banks operate under."

Why we have to support Ireland

November 23, 2010

IRELAND-POLITICS/– Laurence Copeland is a professor of finance at Cardiff University Business School. The opinions expressed are his own. –

from Breakingviews:

The world is wasting a good crisis

By Hugo Dixon
November 22, 2010

Rahm Emanuel, President Barack Obama's former chief of staff, popularized the motto that one shouldn't waste a good crisis. But there is a severe risk that this is precisely what the world has been doing by being excessively soft in bailing out banks and countries since Lehman Brothers went bust in 2008.

from Felix Salmon:

The underwhelming Irish bailout

By Felix Salmon
November 22, 2010

Color me underwhelmed by the Irish bailout. By all accounts it's going to be less than €100 billion -- probably in the €80 billion to €90 billion range -- and that sum has to cover the country's entire borrowing needs for the next three years. The NYT has a breakdown:

Thank you, Gordon Brown

November 11, 2010

BRITAIN-INFLATION/–Laurence Copeland is a professor of finance at Cardiff University Business School. The opinions expressed are his own.–