The Great Debate UK

from Felix Salmon:

Learning from Ireland

By Felix Salmon
November 10, 2010

I love the way that the WSJ today covers the collapse of Ireland's banking system, and with it the country's fiscal leadership. There's little if any actual news here, but that's a feature, not a bug: it frees up the WSJ's writers and editors to present the big-picture narrative in as clear and compelling a manner as possible, without having to overemphasize some small factoid which they happen to be breaking.

from Global News Journal:

Quadriplegic in an age of austerity

October 17, 2010

Every time I write a story on European countries cutting public spending, I feel a frisson of panic. I can't help but fear my health, lifestyle and liberty could be a casualty of the "age of austerity".peter

from Global News Journal:

Ireland’s boasts come home to roost

October 1, 2010

Irish Finance Minister Brian Lenihan

Irish Finance Minister Brian Lenihan

Irish literature and legend is full of boasts, like the claim by Christy Mahon in Synge's "Playboy of the Western World" that he has killed his da with a loy (Irish for spade), only to have the old man track him down in another town.

What is the extent of Ireland’s crisis?

By Guest Contributor
October 1, 2010

- Kathleen Brooks is research director at forex.com. The opinions expressed are her own. -

from The Great Debate:

Irish plight about more than austerity

By J Saft
September 10, 2010

Ireland and its economic unraveling is not simply a test case of the stimulus versus austerity dispute, it is an illustration of the limits and pitfalls of the very popular strategy of keeping the banks ticking over, hiding under a desk and hoping for a strong recovery.

from FaithWorld:

Focus turns to pope as German, Dutch sex abuse scandals unfold

March 11, 2010

benedict host

Pope Benedict XVI in the Saint Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, 2 Feb 2010/Max Rossi

from MacroScope:

Political economy and the euro

February 8, 2010

The reality of  'political economy'  is something that irritates many economists -- the "purists", if you like. The political element is impossible to model;  it often flies in the face of  textbook economics;  and democratic decision-making and backroom horse trading can be notoriously difficult to predict and painfully slow.  And political economy is all pervasive in 2010 -- Barack Obama's proposals to rein in the banks is rooted in public outrage; reading China's monetary and currency policies is like Kremlinology; capital curbs being introduced in Brazil and elsewhere aim to prevent market overshoot; and British budgetary policies are becoming the political football ahead of this spring's UK election. The list is long, the outcomes uncertain, the market risk high.

from FaithWorld:

In abuse by Irish priests, a little “mental reservation”

November 29, 2009

irish-countrysideIt was a ride and I was hitchhiking around Ireland and the driver of a tiny Morris Minor who'd stopped was a priest, so what could be wrong?

from Commentaries:

Ireland puts the EU show back on the road

By Paul Taylor
October 3, 2009

biffoThe EU show is back on the road. Sixteen months after Irish voters brought the European Union's tortured process of institutional reform to a juddering halt by voting "No" to the Lisbon treaty, the same electorate has turned out in larger numbers to say "Yes" by a two-thirds majority.

Thomson Reuters Newsmaker: Ireland and the Lisbon Treaty

By Reuters Staff
September 7, 2009

Political leaders gathered in Dublin to debate both sides of the controversial Lisbon Treaty and the implications it could have on the future of Europe.