The Great Debate UK

Women make better investors, if only more of them had a go

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Claer Barrett- Claer Barrett is associate editor of the Investors Chronicle. The opinions expressed are her own.Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.–

“I’m sorry to tell you that my husband has died, so I want a full refund on his Investors Chronicle subscription.”

It is a sad fact of life, but for a magazine with a high number of elderly male readers, we receive two calls from bereaved widows every week. No doubt, scrupulous management of the family budget over the years has honed their cost-cutting skills. But I secretly wish they would switch the subscription to their own name, and have the confidence to carry on investing in their own right.

It may sound harsh – but I am a firm believer that women make better investors than men. I learned my financial lessons from my mother and grandmother, who battled through the austerity of the post-war years. The concepts of rationing, make do and mend and digging for victory are the epitome of financial prudence. “Look after the pennies,” I was told, “and the pounds will look after themselves.”

International Women’s Day in a post-gender world

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Elisabeth Kelan-Dr Elisabeth Kelan is lecturer in the Department of Management at King’s College London. The opinions expressed are her own. Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.–

To mark International Women’s Day, the Women’s Empowerment Principles: Equality Means Business will be launched in New York on March 9, 2010.

Women leaders: High peaks, low gullies

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glenda_stone- Glenda Stone is an Australian businesswomen in the UK, CEO of Aurora and a commentator on economic gender issues. The opinions expressed are her own. Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.–.-

In Australia there is a common expression of social phenomenon called the “Tall Poppy Syndrome”. It is a pejorative term that describes human behaviour of attacking, despising or attempting to cut down or criticise people of genuine merit because their achievements or talent distinguish them above their peers. Targets are often accomplished people with a public profile: business leaders, politicians, academics – and at times even celebrities and sporting personalities.

Confusion and disorder reign at Beijing + 15

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Annette Lawson

- Annette Lawson is chair of National Alliance of Women’s Organisations in Britain. She has an OBE for services to diversity and is founder and Chair of The Judith Trust, which works for better lives for people with both learning disabilities and mental illness needs. The opinions expressed are her own. Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.–

It is 15 years since the great women’s conference – the 4th World Conference on Women – was held in Beijing.

Kiran Bedi on being India’s first woman police officer

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INDIAOne of India’s most recognised faces, Kiran Bedi is India’s first woman police officer and has a larger-than-life image in a country where police are mostly perceived as inefficient or corrupt or both.

She was an Asian and national tennis champion before she made it to the Indian

Police Service in 1972. Bedi has worked in traffic and narcotics control, prison management and has also been an adviser for United Nations peacekeeping operations.

Does International Women’s Day hold any relevance?

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Chris Parke -Chris Parke is managing director at Talking Talent. The opinions expressed are his own. Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.-

As we celebrate International Women’s Day’s 99th anniversary, we should also be asking ourselves – does it hold any relevance anymore? I would argue that it does. Although gender equality has progressed in leaps and bounds over the decades, there are still plenty of global issues to tackle. Have we really found the holy grail of complete gender equality? Certainly not, and, although there is much to be said for the progress we have made, there are noticeable ‘cracks’ appearing. And the harder people look, the bigger they seem to get.

What women want: the power of the female economy

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clark- Professor Moira Clark is Director of the Henley Centre for Customer Management at Henley Business School. The opinions expressed are her own. Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.–

“What does a woman want?” was a question that tormented Sigmund Freud despite thirty years of research into the “feminine soul”. He felt he was never able to answer this question, and sadly it would seem that many companies today still haven’t figured it out.

Women get paid less; but at least we get cheaper car insurance…

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mason-Rachel Mason is public relations manager at independent financial service providers Fair Investment Company.The opinions expressed are her own.  Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.-

In this day and age, it seems that things are pretty much equal between the sexes; men and women have equal rights, and in theory, can do the same jobs, so why is it that when it comes to money, the gender gap still exists?

Women, asylum and the UK Border Agency

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gvgGauri van Gulik is a Women’s Rights Advocate and Researcher for Human Rights Watch and author of the report “Fast-Tracked Unfairness: Detention and Denial of Women Asylum Seekers in the UK. The opinions expressed are her own. Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.–

Last week, the Home Office Minister Meg Hillier said on the BBC’s Woman’s Hour programme that the UK Border Agency ensures that very complex cases brought by women asylum seekers do not go through the UK’s so-called “detained fast-track” asylum process, a route designed for straightforward asylum claims that can be decided quickly.

Transformative power of microfinance for women

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mehta- Sheetal Mehta is CEO and founder of not for profit organization Shanti Microfinance. The opinions expressed are her own. You can follow her on Twitter. Reuters will host a “follow-the-sun” live blog on Monday, March 8, 2010, International Women’s Day. Please tune in.–

The women of the world still get the rawest deal. Throughout history, in places where life is tough for everyone, women still on average work for longer hours and take on the burden of the household chores.  In its Human Development Report, the United Nations Development Programme reported that 70 percent of the people living on less than $1 dollar (65 pence) per day are women.

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