The Great Debate UK

from Reuters Investigates:

The Silence of the Madoffs

The FBI profiling group made famous in the movie The Silence of the Lambs is turning its attention to white collar criminals. It's not that the FBI has grown bored with serial killers, it is more an indication of the growth industry white collar crime seems to have become.

The financial crisis not only was the undoing of Bernie Madoff's long-running Ponzi scheme, it also brought down Allen Stanford's empire and exposed dozens of other apparent investment schemes. And, lately, it appears federal authorities in New York keep finding another hedge fund trader who made money from illegal stock tips.

So there's plenty of work for the FBI to do in trying to put together a composite of potential white collar felon. But there are plenty of skeptics about whether profiling can work for securities fraudsters.

For more on the debate read our Special Report, " From Hannibal Lecter to Bernie Madoff" in PDF Format: fbiprofiling

from Reuters Investigates:

Hedge fund investors flex their muscles

By Emily Chasan

Bernie Madoff, didn't technically run a hedge fund, but his effects on the industry are still being felt today. 

Hedge fund investors learned the hard way that they wanted to invest in hedge funds with a more institutional feel, and pushed successfully over the past few years for reforms to hedge fund redemption policies, transparency, use of outside fund administrators and even lower fee structures.

Where did all the “Madoff” money go?

Photo
-

Erin Arvedlund- Erin Arvedlund is a journalist who has worked for Dow Jones, The Moscow Times, TheStreet.com, Barron’s and the New York Times.  She is author of “Too Good to be True: The Rise and Fall of Bernie Madoff“. The opinions expressed are her own. -

Where did all the money go?

After I wrote “Madoff: The Man Who Stole $65 Billion” this was probably the first question I received from almost everyone. And I am forced to tell the bizarre truth: there’s probably no money left.

from The Great Debate:

The end of the Davos consensus

-- James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

James Saft Great Debate It's not exactly a wake, but participants at this year's World Economic Forum have witnessed many of their most cherished beliefs being challenged, upended and sometimes ground in the mud.

Think of it as the "Davos Consensus," a loose alignment of principles that held sway in this Swiss mountain resort and in large parts of the world over the past decade.

from The Great Debate:

Minimizing exposure to investment management fraud

williams_mark-- Mark T. Williams, a finance professor at the Boston University School of Management, is a risk-management expert and former Federal Reserve Bank examiner.  The opinions expressed are his own. --

It looks like the oldest trick in the book was used to allegedly bilk wealthy investors, banks, charities, endowments, and hedge funds out of their money.  How could sophisticated investors have been duped by what could potentially be the largest Ponzi scheme in U.S. history?  The answer may center on their due diligence prior to signing up with the investment firm run by Bernard Madoff, accused of masterminding the massive fraud.

  •