The Great Debate UK

from Jack Shafer:

It’s an ad, ad, ad, ad world

By Jack Shafer
March 13, 2014

The last place you'd expect to discover a map to navigate the future of the content-advertising landscape would be a book about the golden age of radio. But damn it all to hell, there it is on the concluding 12 pages of Cynthia B. Meyers' new book, A Word From Our Sponsor: Admen, Advertising, and the Golden Age of Radio.

from The Great Debate:

D.C. scandals: They had Nixon ‘to kick around’

By Conrad Black
July 3, 2013

President Richard Nixon at a White House press conference during the Watergate scandal. REUTERS/Courtesy Nixon Library

Why is The Duchess of Cambridge shutting the stable door now?

By Guest Contributor
September 18, 2012

–By Oliver Smith, Media Lawyer at Keystone Law. The opinions expressed are his own.–

from Paul Smalera:

What real Internet censorship looks like

February 27, 2012

Lately Internet users in the U.S. have been worried about censorship, copyright legalities and data privacy. Between Twitter’s new censorship policy, the global protests over SOPA/PIPA and ACTA and the outrage over Apple’s iOS allowing apps like Path to access the address book without prior approval, these fears have certainly seemed warranted. But we should also remember that Internet users around the world face far more insidious limitations and intrusions on their Internet usage -- practices, in fact, that would horrify the average American.

Could the Murdochs be the saviours of journalism?

July 22, 2011

By Kathleen Brooks. The opinions expressed are her own.

When newspaper moguls are grabbing the headlines something has gone spectacularly wrong, but are we forgetting what the Murdochs have done to preserve print journalism?

from Felix Salmon:

Will the virus claim Rupert Murdoch himself?

By Felix Salmon
July 14, 2011

The News Corp hacking virus is proving both virulent and highly contagious. Rupert Murdoch tried to treat it with amputation, by closing down the News of the World, but the surgery came too late, and he couldn't prevent the virus from spreading to the Sun and the Sunday Times. At that point, the virus was unstoppable: its next victim was Murdoch's $12 billion bid to take control of BSkyB. Now, with the UK police investigation barely having started, the virus has managed to jump over the Atlantic: the FBI is getting involved, looking into allegations that Murdoch's papers tried to hack the phones of 9/11 victims.

from MediaFile:

Is Murdoch free to destroy tabloid’s records?

By Alison Frankel
July 7, 2011

Editor’s note:

After this post was published, News Corp indicated that it did not plan any liquidation of assets in connection with the shutdown of the News of the World newspaper.  In the absence of a liquidation, the scenario laid out by Mark Stephens does not apply.

from Reuters Investigates:

The end of an era for British tabloids?

July 7, 2011

No sooner had our special report today on British tabloids hit the wire than Rupert Murdoch's News Corp shocked everybody by announcing it would close down the 168-year-old News of the World.

from Felix Salmon:

Should bloggers get embargoed World Bank reports?

By Felix Salmon
April 8, 2011

Does the World Bank have a beef with bloggers? According to Aidwatch it does:

This morning we learned that the World Bank does not consider bloggers journalists. According to Bank policy, it won’t give press accreditation to bloggers, denying them access to the media briefing center where new reports are released under embargo before they are published for the public.

from Felix Salmon:

How blogs have changed journalism

By Felix Salmon
March 16, 2011

Benzinga's Laura Hlebasko sent me some questions about blogs and online media for a feature she's writing. Here they are, along with my answers: