The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

For Russia, Syria is not in the Middle East

By Brenda Shaffer
May 20, 2013

Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with (clockwise, starting in top left.) U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, British Prime Minister David Cameron, next Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. REUTERS/FILES

from The Great Debate:

Obama faces only hard choices in Mideast

By Aaron David Miller
December 6, 2012

The conventional wisdom in Washington these days is that a newly empowered president, freed from the political constraints of reelection, will have more discretion, drive and determination to take on the Middle East’s most intractable problems.

from The Great Debate:

The key to understanding the ‘Arab Spring’

By Graeme Bannerman
October 11, 2012

The United States has been unable to develop a clear national policy about the Arab Spring largely because Washington does not fully understand what’s happening in the Middle East.

from Ian Bremmer:

G-zero and the end of the 9/11 era top 2012 risks

By Ian Bremmer
January 5, 2012

In a video for Reuters, Ian Bremmer discusses the biggest risks facing the markets in 2012 and says the next phase in the Middle East and the post-9/11 environment pose the greatest uncertainty:

from FaithWorld:

Will the Arab Spring bring U.S.-style “culture wars” to the Middle East?

June 21, 2011

(From left: Olivier Roy, Cardinal Angelo Scola and Martino Diez of the Oasis Foundation at the conference on San Servolo island, Venice, June 20, 2011/Giorgia Dalle Ore/Oasis)

from Breakingviews:

G8 can help transform Middle East economies

May 25, 2011

By Una Galani
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

from The Great Debate:

Why democracy will win

By Philip N. Howard
March 25, 2011


Philip N. Howard, an associate professor at the University of Washington, is the author of "The Digital Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy:  Information Technology and Political Islam". The opinions expressed are his own.

Don’t blame politicians for pragmatic foreign ties

February 28, 2011


By Laurence Copeland

There are times when even a cynic like me has to feel some sympathy for politicians. Take the case of Libya, for example. Over the forty years of Muammar Gaddafi’s regime, relations between Britain (and our Western allies) and Libya have varied from lukewarm to cold and back to lukewarm again.

from FaithWorld:

Can Arabs learn from Turkish model of Islam and democracy?

February 3, 2011


(Turkey's Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan in Ankara, December 2, 2008/Umit Bektas)