The Great Debate UK

from Business Traveller:

My city’s better than yours

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“The leading cities of the world – the global cities – are the very nodal hubs that knit the global economy together. Without these global cities, there would be no global economy.”
Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong, global economic advisor, MasterCard

Why MasterCard’s recently released “Worldwide Index of Global Destination Cities” should pique the interest of meeting planners, dealmakers, investors and governments the world over.

Billed as a new approach to understanding the global economy in terms of connectivity, the study has some huge implications. And to better explain them, I met with its Canadian author, Dr. Yuwa Hedrick-Wong.

Knowing that international travel is a canny indicator of cities’ economic growth, Hedrick-Wong built an Index that involved number-crunching international travel and cross-border expenditures using data not readily available in the past, for and between 132 cities (45 from Asia-Pacific; 33 from Europe; 21 Middle East & Africa; 19 from Latina America; and 14 from North America).

from FaithWorld:

Fears rise over growing anti-Muslim feeling in U.S.

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wtc 1 (Photo: An honor guard trumpeter plays during the ceremony on the ninth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks in New York September 11, 2010/Chris Hondros)

Amid threats of Koran burning and a heated dispute over a planned Muslim cultural center in New York, Muslim leaders and rights activists warn of growing anti-Muslim feeling in America partly provoked for political reasons.  "Many people now treat Muslims as 'the other' -- as something to vilify and to discriminate against," said Daniel Mach of the American Civil Liberties Union. And, he said, some people have exploited that fear in the media, "for political gain or cheap notoriety."

The imam leading the project to build the cultural center, including a prayer room, near the site of the September 11, 2001 attacks said there was a rise of what he called "Islamophobia" and the debate had been radicalized by extremists. "The radicals in the United States and the radicals in the Muslim world feed off each other. And to a certain extent, the attention that they've been able to get by the media has even aggravated the problem," Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf in an interview with ABC news aired on Sunday.

Interfaith centre at New York 9/11 site sparks controversy

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- Mark Kobayashi-Hillary is the author of several books, including ‘Who Moved my Job?’ and ‘Global Services: Moving to a Level Playing Field’.  The opinions expressed are his own. -

Not every Muslim is a terrorist, but every terrorist who attacked the U.S. on 9/11 was a Muslim.

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