The Great Debate UK

D-Day Dispatch: The first reporter on the beach

“I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full Victory.” Dwight D Eisenhower, D- DAY – June 6, 1944

  <em>"Since before daybreak, bombers and fighters had cascaded their cargoes on German gun emplacements and pillboxes, scoured the skies for the Luftwaffe and probed ahead for tactical targets. This was war in its totality, theatrical and terrifying. The greatest combined operation in history was underway and this time, I was not just in the stalls but on the stage."</em>Doon Campbell, Reuters correspondent, ‘Magic Mistress – A 30 year affair with Reuters’</p><p> 

“Since before daybreak, bombers and fighters had cascaded their cargoes on German gun emplacements and pillboxes, scoured the skies for the Luftwaffe and probed ahead for tactical targets. This was war in its totality, theatrical and terrifying. The greatest combined operation in history was underway and this time, I was not just in the stalls but on the stage.”Doon Campbell, Reuters correspondent, ‘Magic Mistress – A 30 year affair with Reuters’

Seventy years ago, the Normandy landings, which began on D-Day ( June 6, 1944), marked  the beginning of the end of the Second World War. Codenamed  ‘Operation Neptune’, the Allies, under the supreme command of U.S. General Dwight D Eisenhower, regained a foothold in Western Europe. Many months would pass before Hitler committed suicide, but from this moment, the days of his ‘Third Reich’ were numbered.

Born with only half a left arm, Doon Campbell (pictured above), one of the Reuters D-Day correspondents, was ineligible to join the British forces. But with a name like ‘Doon’ he was almost predestined to opt for the next best thing – the ‘Boys Own Adventure’ career of a War Correspondent. At 24 years-old, he was not only the youngest British war correspondent covering the invasion, he was also the first reporter to set foot on the Normandy beaches with the sea-borne force.

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