The Great Debate UK

from MacroScope:

There be feudin’ at the BoE

February 28, 2012

The once-good relationship between Bank of England Governor Mervyn King and his most likely successor, Deputy Governor Paul Tucker, is coming  under increasing strain, according to a new book by former Daily Telegraph journalist Dan Conaghan.  It  alleges   King’s management style and and alleged disdain for the financial markets is to blame.

The QE billions should go direct to consumers

October 12, 2011

By Mark Hillary. The opinions expressed are his own.

In 1998, the Japanese government was ridiculed for giving away almost $6bn (at 1998 value) of shopping vouchers. The plan was that consumers would spend more of this ‘free money’ and help lift Japan out of the seemingly endless malaise it suffered in the nineties – as many other developed economies were enjoying a roaring decade.

Does the world need more QE from the Fed?

By Guest Contributor
October 14, 2010

- Kathleen Brooks is research director at forex.com. The opinions expressed are her own -

Monetary policy: QE2 or the Titanic?

October 1, 2010

“Those whom the gods would destroy, they first drive mad.” – the words of a wise Roman thinker (or was it a Greek central banker?). At any rate, the gods certainly seem to have no benevolent intentions with regard to this country, judging by the statements coming from the Bank of England, in particular the calls for another round of quantitative easing from one member of the Monetary Policy Committee and the cry of “Spend, spend, spend” from another.

Part-paid gilts should return

April 23, 2009

REUTERS– Neil Collins is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own –

Bank of England faces dilemma on QE extension

April 9, 2009

johnkemp– John Kemp is a Reuters columnist. The views expressed are his own –

Quantitative easing a last resort

April 9, 2009

img_3391-alan-clarke-Alan Clarke is UK economist at BNP Paribas. The opinions expressed are his own-

As expected, the Bank of England left the Bank Rate unchanged at 0.5 percent at the April meeting, the first unchanged decision since September 2008.