The Great Debate UK

Ask the regulator

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Hector Sants, Chief Executive of the Financial Services Authority, has agreed to take questions from Reuters readers after he delivers his first major speech on the future of financial market supervision on March 12th at the Thomson Reuters Building in London.

Sants, who was appointed just before Northern Rock was plunged into crisis, said last month that fresh thinking was needed in financial market supervision, pledged to get more involved in assessing the competence of senior bankers and waived his entitlement to a bonus for last year amid criticism of the FSA’s performance.

So what should the FSA do to sort out the banks and the markets? Reuters columnist Jim Saft gives his assessment of the challenges facing the regulator:

Thomas Raber, Managing Director of Alvine Capital, sees changes to the regulation of hedge funds as important:

from The Great Debate:

The end of the Davos consensus

-- James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own --

James Saft Great Debate It's not exactly a wake, but participants at this year's World Economic Forum have witnessed many of their most cherished beliefs being challenged, upended and sometimes ground in the mud.

Think of it as the "Davos Consensus," a loose alignment of principles that held sway in this Swiss mountain resort and in large parts of the world over the past decade.

from James Saft:

Stephen Schwarzman’s hair of the dog

jimsaftcolumnSo what is Blackstone Group chairman Stephen Schwarzman's prescription for solving the banking crisis?

More leverage and less transparency, apparently.

Schwarzman told a panel at Davos that you can't mandate higher levels of bank capital at the same time losses are mounting and that mark-to-market accounting needed to be changed.

from The Great Debate:

Brace yourself: Political-market risks in 2009

prestonkeat-- Preston Keat is director of research at Eurasia Group, a global political risk consultancy, and author of the forthcoming book “The Fat Tail: The Power of Political Knowledge for Strategic Investors” (with Ian Bremmer). Any views expressed are his own. For the related story, click here.

There are a number of macro risks that will continue to grab headlines in 2009, including the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, cross-border tensions and state instability in Pakistan, and Iran's 
ongoing quest to develop advanced nuclear technologies.

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