The Great Debate UK

from The Great Debate:

For such a rich guy, Donald Trump looks kind of sad

By Dan Hill
July 29, 2015

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I expected disgust -- and its first cousin contempt -- to be the most frequent emotions on Donald Trump’s mug as he announced his campaign for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination. After all, disgust would make perfect sense. It’s an emotion in keeping with Trump’s repeated comments about the current state of America as something that smells and tastes bad -- if not literally, then at least metaphorically.  

from The Great Debate:

If Obama really wants to close Guantanamo, here’s what he needs to do

By Daphne Eviatar
May 20, 2015

U.S. President Barack Obama signs an executive order in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington

President Barack Obama speaks before signing the executive order to close the military prison at Guantanamo, Cuba, in the Oval Office on his second official day at the White House in Washington, January 22, 2009. REUTERS/Larry Downing

from The Great Debate:

Israel’s dangerous new game playing out in Washington’s corridors of power

By Bill Schneider
January 27, 2015

U.S. President Barack Obama meets with Israel's PM Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House in Washington

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu listens as President Barack Obama (R) speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, October 1, 2014. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

from Anatole Kaletsky:

Why political gridlock works for the U.S. economy, but not for Japan or EU

By Anatole Kaletsky
November 7, 2014

U.S. President Obama hosts a luncheon for bi-partisan Congressional leaders in the Old Family Dining Room at the White House in Washington

Is gridlocked government a betrayal of democracy? Or does it allow citizens to get on with their lives and businesses, unencumbered by meddlesome politicians?

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Fighting for the future of conservativism

By Nicholas Wapshott
May 13, 2014

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron delivers a speech to placard waving Conservatives during an European election campaign rally at a science park in Bristol

Establishment Republicans have been delighted by the victory of Thom Tillis, their favored candidate in last week’s North Carolina primary. After expensive advertising campaigns by establishment bagmen like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and Karl Rove’s American Crossroads, mainstream conservatives believe they have a candidate who can beat Democrat Kay Hagan to win a valuable Senate seat in November.

from The Great Debate:

Why the U.S. must lead on Disabilities Treaty

By Bill Frist
November 5, 2013

In an HIV clinic in Africa, a man born deaf holds a single sheet of paper with a plus sign. He looks for help, but no one at the clinic speaks sign language. In fact, the staff doesn’t seem interested in helping him at all.

from The Great Debate:

Why doesn’t Mitt Romney contribute to his own campaign?

By Michael Waldman
September 25, 2012

Lately, Mitt Romney has been so consumed with fundraising that his aides have had to defend his absence from the stump. Like his foe, the Republican nominee is in the midst of a frenzied financial arms race. But one hugely wealthy individual has not yet been persuaded to part with much cash to support the Republican cause: Mitt Romney himself.

from The Great Debate:

Romney’s campaign into oblivion

By Harold Evans
September 24, 2012

Willard Mitt Romney was born with a silver foot in his mouth.

It is possible to forgive it as a congenital trait. After all, his Dad, the genial George Romney, successful head of the American Motor Corp and governor of Michigan (1963-69), lost his bid for the Republican nomination for the presidency in 1968 by setting a world record for the mass manufacture of gaffes. He had such a penchant for saying one thing and then retracting it, the reporter Jack Germond announced he was fixing his keyboard so that one keystroke produced “Romney later explained…” It was charming for a time to hear what George had said lately, but when he came back from a look at the Vietnam War, he announced he’d had “the greatest brainwashing anyone could get.” His rival Eugene McCarthy cracked that a light rinse would have been enough to relieve George’s neurological condition, but this time George had gone a gaffe too far. Some American prisoners released by the Chinese had renounced their U.S. citizenship, saying they’d been brainwashed, and primary voters had no enthusiasm for electing a president who might turn out to have been the Manchurian candidate. So we got Nixon and Agnew instead. Thanks, George.

U.S. debt downgrade: Who cares?

August 2, 2011

By Laurence Copeland. The opinions expressed are his own.

As I write this blog, it looks as though the U.S. Congress is going to pass a bill raising the debt ceiling and making modest cuts in Federal Government spending over the coming years. Although it is, quite rightly, being presented as a somewhat hollow victory for the forces of reason, there is one extremely puzzling aspect of the crisis.

from Breakingviews:

Wall Street could suffer some voters’ remorse

November 3, 2010

U.S. midterm elections brought a degree of sweet payback for banks miffed about financial reform and President Barack Obama's populist rhetoric. Their campaign dollars helped fund huge Republican gains. But the new Tea Party-infused GOP will present as many challenges as opportunities.